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Effects of Terpene Chemotypes of Melaleuca alternifolia on Two Specialist Leaf Beetles and Susceptibility to Myrtle Rust

Bustos-Segura, Carlos; Kulheim, Carsten; Foley, William

Description

Plant chemical polymorphisms, or plant chemotypes, are characterized by intraspecific discrete differences of plant secondary metabolites in the same plant tissue. Chemotypes that differ in foliar terpene composition are found commonly in Myrtaceae. In this study, we focused on terpene chemotypes of medicinal tea tree, Melalecua alternifolia, to explore whether this variation affects two specialist herbivores Paropsisterna tigrina and Faex sp. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), and if this could...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBustos-Segura, Carlos
dc.contributor.authorKulheim, Carsten
dc.contributor.authorFoley, William
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:37:41Z
dc.identifier.issn0098-0331
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/77199
dc.description.abstractPlant chemical polymorphisms, or plant chemotypes, are characterized by intraspecific discrete differences of plant secondary metabolites in the same plant tissue. Chemotypes that differ in foliar terpene composition are found commonly in Myrtaceae. In this study, we focused on terpene chemotypes of medicinal tea tree, Melalecua alternifolia, to explore whether this variation affects two specialist herbivores Paropsisterna tigrina and Faex sp. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), and if this could explain the maintenance of this variation. We tested whether insect performance, oviposition preference, and plant damage were associated with different chemotypes. We found that larval growth rate of Faex sp. was higher in chemotypes with high concentrations of 1,8-cineole, and that oviposition preference depended on the chemotype of the larval diet. Although performance traits and preference for oviposition of P. tigrina did not vary among chemotypes, adults inflicted less damage on plants with a high concentration of terpinolene. Additionally, we tested whether different chemotypes showed different levels of susceptibility by myrtle rust (Puccinia psidii). We found that plants with a high concentration of 1,8-cineole were more likely to be infected under controlled conditions. Although there is evidence that terpene chemotypes are a mediator of the interaction with natural enemies, the most detrimental pest of this plant, P. tigrina, does not seem to be affected by variation in plant terpenes.
dc.publisherPlenum Publishing Corporation
dc.sourceJournal of Chemical Ecology
dc.titleEffects of Terpene Chemotypes of Melaleuca alternifolia on Two Specialist Leaf Beetles and Susceptibility to Myrtle Rust
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume41
dc.date.issued2015
local.identifier.absfor060200 - ECOLOGY
local.identifier.absfor060800 - ZOOLOGY
local.identifier.absfor070500 - FORESTRY SCIENCES
local.identifier.ariespublicationU3488905xPUB6090
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationBustos-Segura, Carlos, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationKulheim, Carsten, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationFoley, William, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue10
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage937
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage947
local.identifier.doi10.1007/s10886-015-0628-0
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T09:37:41Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84942057277
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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