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Immigration Policy and the Skills of Immigrants to Australia, Canada and the United States

Cobb-Clark, Deborah; Antecol, Heather; Trejo, Stephen

Description

Census data for 1990/91 indicate that Australian and Canadian immigrants have higher levels of English fluency, education, and income (relative to natives) than do U.S. immigrants. This skill deficit for U.S. immigrants arises primarily because the United States receives a much larger share of immigrants from Latin America than do the other two countries. After excluding Latin American immigrants, the observable skills of immigrants are similar in the three countries. These patterns suggest...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorCobb-Clark, Deborah
dc.contributor.authorAntecol, Heather
dc.contributor.authorTrejo, Stephen
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:37:25Z
dc.identifier.issn0022-166X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/77092
dc.description.abstractCensus data for 1990/91 indicate that Australian and Canadian immigrants have higher levels of English fluency, education, and income (relative to natives) than do U.S. immigrants. This skill deficit for U.S. immigrants arises primarily because the United States receives a much larger share of immigrants from Latin America than do the other two countries. After excluding Latin American immigrants, the observable skills of immigrants are similar in the three countries. These patterns suggest that the comparatively low overall skill level of U.S. immigrants may have more to do with geographic and historical ties to Mexico than with the fact that skill-based admissions are less important in the United States than in Australia and Canada.
dc.publisherUniversity of Wisconsin Press
dc.sourceJournal of Human Resources
dc.source.urihttp://www.wisc.edu/wisconsinpress/
dc.subjectKeywords: educational attainment; immigrant population; immigration policy; Australia; Canada; United States
dc.titleImmigration Policy and the Skills of Immigrants to Australia, Canada and the United States
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolumeXXXVIII
dc.date.issued2003
local.identifier.absfor140211 - Labour Economics
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub5961
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationCobb-Clark, Deborah, College of Business and Economics, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationAntecol, Heather, Claremont McKenna College
local.contributor.affiliationTrejo, Stephen, University of Texas
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage193
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage218
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T09:36:41Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-0037413079
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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