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Contrast response of temporally sparse dichoptic multifocal visual evoked potentials

Maddess, Ted; James, Andrew; Bowman, Elizabeth

Description

Temporally sparse stimuli have been found to produce larger multifocal visual evoked potentials than rapid contrast-reversal stimuli. We compared the contrast-response functions of conventional contrast-reversing (CR) stimuli and three grades of temporally sparse stimuli, examining both the changes in response amplitude and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). All stimuli were presented dichoptically to normal adult human subjects. One stimulus variant, the slowest pattern pulse, had interleaved...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMaddess, Ted
dc.contributor.authorJames, Andrew
dc.contributor.authorBowman, Elizabeth
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:35:25Z
dc.date.available2015-12-13T22:35:25Z
dc.identifier.issn0952-5238
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/76583
dc.description.abstractTemporally sparse stimuli have been found to produce larger multifocal visual evoked potentials than rapid contrast-reversal stimuli. We compared the contrast-response functions of conventional contrast-reversing (CR) stimuli and three grades of temporally sparse stimuli, examining both the changes in response amplitude and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). All stimuli were presented dichoptically to normal adult human subjects. One stimulus variant, the slowest pattern pulse, had interleaved monocular and binocular stimuli. Response amplitudes and SNRs were similar for all stimuli at contrast 0.4 but grew faster with increasing contrast for the sparser stimuli. The best sparse stimulus provided an SNR improvement that corresponded to a recording time improvement of 2,6 times relative to that required for contrast reversing stimuli. Multiple regression of log-transformed response metrics characterized the contrast-response functions by fitting power-law relationships. The exponents for the two sparsest stimuli were significantly larger (P < 0.001) than for the CR stimuli, as were the mean response amplitudes and signal-to-noise ratios for these stimuli. The contrast-dependent response enhancement is discussed with respect to the possible influences of rapid retinal contrast gain control, or intracortical and cortico-geniculate feedback.
dc.publisherCambridge University Press
dc.sourceVisual Neuroscience
dc.subjectKeywords: adult; article; evoked visual response; female; human; human experiment; male; multiple regression; normal human; priority journal; signal noise ratio; stimulus response; Adult; Contrast Sensitivity; Evoked Potentials, Visual; Female; Humans; Male; Middle Contrast gain control; Contrast response; Multifocal; Sparse stimuli; VEP
dc.titleContrast response of temporally sparse dichoptic multifocal visual evoked potentials
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume225
dc.date.issued2005
local.identifier.absfor110906 - Sensory Systems
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub5397
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationMaddess, Ted, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationJames, Andrew, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBowman, Elizabeth, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage153
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage162
local.identifier.doi10.1017/S0952523805222046
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T09:27:53Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-21244505325
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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