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Rapid acclimation of juvenile corals to CO2-mediated acidification by upregulation of heat shock protein and Bcl-2 genes

Moya, A.; Huisman, L.; Foret, Sylvain; Gattuso, Jean-Pierre; Hayward, David; Ball, Eldon; Miller, David J.

Description

Corals play a key role in ocean ecosystems and carbonate balance, but their molecular response to ocean acidification remains unclear. The only previous whole-transcriptome study (Moya et al. Molecular Ecology, 2012; 21, 2440) documented extensive disruption of gene expression, particularly of genes encoding skeletal organic matrix proteins, in juvenile corals (Acropora millepora) after short-term (3 d) exposure to elevated pCO2. In this study, whole-transcriptome analysis was used to compare...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMoya, A.
dc.contributor.authorHuisman, L.
dc.contributor.authorForet, Sylvain
dc.contributor.authorGattuso, Jean-Pierre
dc.contributor.authorHayward, David
dc.contributor.authorBall, Eldon
dc.contributor.authorMiller, David J.
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:35:18Z
dc.identifier.issn0962-1083
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/76530
dc.description.abstractCorals play a key role in ocean ecosystems and carbonate balance, but their molecular response to ocean acidification remains unclear. The only previous whole-transcriptome study (Moya et al. Molecular Ecology, 2012; 21, 2440) documented extensive disruption of gene expression, particularly of genes encoding skeletal organic matrix proteins, in juvenile corals (Acropora millepora) after short-term (3 d) exposure to elevated pCO2. In this study, whole-transcriptome analysis was used to compare the effects of such 'acute' (3 d) exposure to elevated pCO2 with a longer ('prolonged'; 9 d) period of exposure beginning immediately post-fertilization. Far fewer genes were differentially expressed under the 9-d treatment, and although the transcriptome data implied wholesale disruption of metabolism and calcification genes in the acute treatment experiment, expression of most genes was at control levels after prolonged treatment. There was little overlap between the genes responding to the acute and prolonged treatments, but heat shock proteins (HSPs) and heat shock factors (HSFs) were over-represented amongst the genes responding to both treatments. Amongst these was an HSP70 gene previously shown to be involved in acclimation to thermal stress in a field population of another acroporid coral. The most obvious feature of the molecular response in the 9-d treatment experiment was the upregulation of five distinct Bcl-2 family members, the majority predicted to be anti-apoptotic. This suggests that an important component of the longer term response to elevated CO2 is suppression of apoptosis. It therefore appears that juvenile A. millepora have the capacity to rapidly acclimate to elevated pCO2, a process mediated by upregulation of specific HSPs and a suite of Bcl-2 family members.
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.rightsCopyright Information: © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
dc.sourceMolecular Ecology
dc.titleRapid acclimation of juvenile corals to CO2-mediated acidification by upregulation of heat shock protein and Bcl-2 genes
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume24
dc.date.issued2015
local.identifier.absfor060306 - Evolutionary Impacts of Climate Change
local.identifier.absfor060405 - Gene Expression (incl. Microarray and other genome-wide approaches)
local.identifier.ariespublicationU3488905xPUB5345
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationMoya, A., James Cook University
local.contributor.affiliationHuisman, L., James Cook University
local.contributor.affiliationForet, Sylvain, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationGattuso, Jean-Pierre, INSU-CNRS, Laboratoire d'Océanographie de Villefranche
local.contributor.affiliationHayward, David, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBall, Eldon, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationMiller, David J., James Cook University
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
dc.relationhttp://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/DP1095343
local.bibliographicCitation.issue2
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage438
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage452
local.identifier.doi10.1111/mec.13021
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T10:07:06Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84920971191
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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