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Using X-ray fluorescence core scanning to assess acid sulfate soils

Proske, Ulrike; Heijnis, Hendrik; Gadd, Patricia S.

Description

During the formation of acid sulfate soils (ASS), several chemical elements in the sediment are mobilised. These elements are removed from the sediment or become enriched as precipitates in distinct horizons. The stratigraphic depth in which these precipitates accumulate is element-specific and is located either within the oxidised or in a transitional zone between the oxidised and the reduced zone. Aim of this study is to demonstrate how X-ray fluorescence core scanning, together with detailed...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorProske, Ulrike
dc.contributor.authorHeijnis, Hendrik
dc.contributor.authorGadd, Patricia S.
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:34:29Z
dc.identifier.issn1838-675X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/76140
dc.description.abstractDuring the formation of acid sulfate soils (ASS), several chemical elements in the sediment are mobilised. These elements are removed from the sediment or become enriched as precipitates in distinct horizons. The stratigraphic depth in which these precipitates accumulate is element-specific and is located either within the oxidised or in a transitional zone between the oxidised and the reduced zone. Aim of this study is to demonstrate how X-ray fluorescence core scanning, together with detailed sediment descriptions, can be used to perform an initial assessment of these different zones in ASS in a fast and cost-effective manner. We measured the chemical element signatures of K, Fe, Pb, Sr, Zn, Ni, Y, Mn and Ca in two sediment cores from Western Australia where ASS are suspected to occur. The oxidised zone in both cores is characterised by the occurrence of jarosite, which is indicated by pale straw yellow mottling and synchronous peaks in Fe/Ti, K/Ti, Pb/Ti and Sr/Ti, and of other secondary Fe-oxides, which are indicated by reddish mottling and synchronous peaks in Fe/Ti and Pb/Ti. The transition zone into reduced material is marked by synchronous peaks in Zn/Ti, Ni/Ti, Y/Ti and Mn/Ti. Based on these characteristic signatures, we broadly estimated the depth of the oxidised and the transitional zone at both sites.
dc.publisherCSIRO Publishing
dc.sourceSoil Research
dc.titleUsing X-ray fluorescence core scanning to assess acid sulfate soils
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume52
dc.date.issued2014
local.identifier.absfor050206 - Environmental Monitoring
local.identifier.absfor050304 - Soil Chemistry (excl. Carbon Sequestration Science)
local.identifier.ariespublicationU3488905xPUB5021
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationProske, Ulrike, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationHeijnis, Hendrik, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation
local.contributor.affiliationGadd, Patricia S., Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue8
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage760
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage768
local.identifier.doi10.1071/SR14103
local.identifier.absseo960902 - Coastal and Estuarine Land Management
local.identifier.absseo961401 - Coastal and Estuarine Soils
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T09:21:29Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84912524664
local.identifier.thomsonID000346664200003
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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