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The impact of recreational MDMA 'ecstasy' use on global form processing

White, Claire; Edwards, Mark; Brown, John; Bell, Jason

Description

The ability to integrate local orientation information into a global form percept was investigated in long-term ecstasy users. Evidence suggests that ecstasy disrupts the serotonin system, with the visual areas of the brain being particularly susceptible. Previous research has found altered orientation processing in the primary visual area (V1) of users, thought to be due to disrupted serotonin-mediated lateral inhibition. The current study aimed to investigate whether orientation deficits...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorWhite, Claire
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, Mark
dc.contributor.authorBrown, John
dc.contributor.authorBell, Jason
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:34:14Z
dc.identifier.issn0269-8811
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/76031
dc.description.abstractThe ability to integrate local orientation information into a global form percept was investigated in long-term ecstasy users. Evidence suggests that ecstasy disrupts the serotonin system, with the visual areas of the brain being particularly susceptible. Previous research has found altered orientation processing in the primary visual area (V1) of users, thought to be due to disrupted serotonin-mediated lateral inhibition. The current study aimed to investigate whether orientation deficits extend to higher visual areas involved in global form processing. Forty-five participants completed a psychophysical (Glass pattern) study allowing an investigation into the mechanisms underlying global form processing and sensitivity to changes in the offset of the stimuli (jitter). A subgroup of polydrug-ecstasy users (n=6) with high ecstasy use had significantly higher thresholds for the detection of Glass patterns than controls (n=21, p=0.039) after Bonferroni correction. There was also a significant interaction between jitter level and drug-group, with polydrug-ecstasy users showing reduced sensitivity to alterations in jitter level (p=0.003). These results extend previous research, suggesting disrupted global form processing and reduced sensitivity to orientation jitter with ecstasy use. Further research is needed to investigate this finding in a larger sample of heavy ecstasy users and to differentiate the effects of other drugs.
dc.publisherSage Publications Inc
dc.sourceJournal of Psychopharmacology
dc.titleThe impact of recreational MDMA 'ecstasy' use on global form processing
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume28
dc.date.issued2014
local.identifier.absfor170202 - Decision Making
local.identifier.ariespublicationU3488905xPUB4941
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationWhite, Claire, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationEdwards, Mark, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBrown, John, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBell, Jason, University of Western Australia
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue11
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1018
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage1029
local.identifier.doi10.1177/0269881114546709
local.identifier.absseo920414 - Substance Abuse
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T09:18:42Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84910053136
local.identifier.thomsonID000343976600006
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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