Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Diabetes clinic attendance improves diabetes management in an urban Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population

Chung, Frederick; Herceg, Ana; Bookallil, Marianne

Description

Background: Optimal diabetes management involves frequent monitoring and achievement of outcome targets. A primary care diabetes clinic that provides a 'one-stop shop' may facilitate more regular review and improve patient care. Methods: A retrospective clinical audit was conducted of adult patients with type 2 diabetes, who attended an urban Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service (ACCHS) in Canberra during 2012 (n = 65). Diabetes clinic attendees were compared with non-attendees for...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorChung, Frederick
dc.contributor.authorHerceg, Ana
dc.contributor.authorBookallil, Marianne
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:34:13Z
dc.identifier.issn0300-8495
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/76027
dc.description.abstractBackground: Optimal diabetes management involves frequent monitoring and achievement of outcome targets. A primary care diabetes clinic that provides a 'one-stop shop' may facilitate more regular review and improve patient care. Methods: A retrospective clinical audit was conducted of adult patients with type 2 diabetes, who attended an urban Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Service (ACCHS) in Canberra during 2012 (n = 65). Diabetes clinic attendees were compared with non-attendees for the proportion meeting guidelines targets from The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners. Results: The average age of the patients was 56 years and 29% were smokers. There was a statistically significant difference between diabetes clinic attendees and non-attendees in meeting diabetes check guidelines, pneumococcal vaccination and use of hypoglycaemic medication. Despite this difference, clinical outcomes between the two groups were not statistically different. Discussion: A comprehensive diabetes clinic may improve management in the ACCHS setting. The clinic promotes regular checks and higher vaccination rates, although insufficient evidence exists to show that this translates to better clinical outcomes. This model may be transferrable to other primary care settings.
dc.publisherRoyal Australian College of General Practioners
dc.rightsAuthor/s retain copyright
dc.sourceAustralian Family Physician
dc.titleDiabetes clinic attendance improves diabetes management in an urban Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume43
dc.date.issued2014
local.identifier.absfor111700 - PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES
local.identifier.ariespublicationU3488905xPUB4937
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationChung, Frederick, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationHerceg, Ana, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBookallil, Marianne, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue11
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage797
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage802
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T09:18:36Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84910011838
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Chung_Diabetes_clinic_attendance_2014.pdf179.42 kBAdobe PDF


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator