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The political decline of traditional Ulama in Indonesia: The state, Umma and Nahdlatul Ulama

Fealy, Gregory; Bush, Robin

Description

Political wisdom in Indonesia has long held that its large mass-based Muslim organizations, Nahdlatul Ulama (nu) and Muhammadiyah, are politically influential. Within the current democratizing environment ulama have faced many challenges to their social standing and it is our contention in this article that their socio-political role has been diminished in this environment. In order to gauge this situation, the Asia Foundation, working with Indonesian research organizations, conducted a...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorFealy, Gregory
dc.contributor.authorBush, Robin
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:34:09Z
dc.identifier.issn1568-4849
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/75999
dc.description.abstractPolitical wisdom in Indonesia has long held that its large mass-based Muslim organizations, Nahdlatul Ulama (nu) and Muhammadiyah, are politically influential. Within the current democratizing environment ulama have faced many challenges to their social standing and it is our contention in this article that their socio-political role has been diminished in this environment. In order to gauge this situation, the Asia Foundation, working with Indonesian research organizations, conducted a nation-wide survey to explore the changing ways that these Muslim organizations wield political influence, especially at the local level. The survey results confirm that religious figures, or ulama, within nu and Muhammadiyah, do not wield the same kind of direct political influence as they have historically, but this article also highlights how these leaders are still important power brokers at the local level.
dc.publisherTimes Academic Press
dc.sourceAsian Journal of Social Science
dc.titleThe political decline of traditional Ulama in Indonesia: The state, Umma and Nahdlatul Ulama
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume42
dc.date.issued2014
local.identifier.absfor160600 - POLITICAL SCIENCE
local.identifier.absfor220400 - RELIGION AND RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS
local.identifier.ariespublicationU3488905xPUB4919
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationFealy, Gregory, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBush, Robin, RTI International
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue5
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage536
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage560
local.identifier.doi10.1163/15685314-04205004
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T09:18:13Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84908663895
local.identifier.thomsonID000344437100003
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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