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Exploring the intersectoral partnerships guiding Australia's dietary advice

Dixon, Jane; Sindall, Colin; Banwell, Cathy

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In 1986, the Ottawa Charter alerted a new generation of health promotion practitioners to the benefits of working with the non-health sectors; including the commercial sector. Since then, the establishment of partnerships with government and non-government bodies has been advanced as a positive way of fostering policies that enhance health and well-being. The food and nutrition field has enthusiastically adopted partnerships between government, non-government and industry. In this article, we...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorDixon, Jane
dc.contributor.authorSindall, Colin
dc.contributor.authorBanwell, Cathy
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:32:59Z
dc.date.available2015-12-13T22:32:59Z
dc.identifier.issn0957-4824
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/75823
dc.description.abstractIn 1986, the Ottawa Charter alerted a new generation of health promotion practitioners to the benefits of working with the non-health sectors; including the commercial sector. Since then, the establishment of partnerships with government and non-government bodies has been advanced as a positive way of fostering policies that enhance health and well-being. The food and nutrition field has enthusiastically adopted partnerships between government, non-government and industry. In this article, we focus on the tactics employed by industry bodies to further their cause in a range of fields that are characterized by risk and contestation. We describe the nature of the alliances and interactions between commercial, scientific and government groups whose stated aim is to improve Australia's diet. Our analysis shows that these partnerships have been guided less by the ethos of the Ottawa Charter and more by the interests of the various parties: namely the food industry's need for credibility in making health claims, the financial imperatives of professional bodies and scientists whose public funding is inadequate, and government endorsement of public-private partnerships as the preferred mechanism for service delivery. The symbiotic relationship that is emerging between segments of the food industry and the nutrition professions raises questions about the independence of the dietary advice being given to consumers. We conclude by arguing for a research programme to investigate the consequences of intersectoral partnerships on the nutritional status of the population.
dc.publisherOxford University Press
dc.sourceHealth Promotion International
dc.subjectKeywords: Australia; diet therapy; feeding behavior; food industry; government; health care delivery; health care policy; health promotion; human; politics; priority journal; public relations; review; Australia; Diet; Federal Government; Food Technology; Health Edu Food industry; Intersectoral partnerships; Nutrition
dc.titleExploring the intersectoral partnerships guiding Australia's dietary advice
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume19
dc.date.issued2004
local.identifier.absfor111199 - Nutrition and Dietetics not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub4810
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationDixon, Jane, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationSindall, Colin, Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing
local.contributor.affiliationBanwell, Cathy, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage5
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage13
local.identifier.doi10.1093/heapro/dah102
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T09:13:02Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-1642352075
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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