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Post-hegemony and Gramsci: a bridge too far?

Emerson, Guy

Description

This article expands upon the theory of post-hegemony so as to maintain the multitude as an operative political category alongside the State. Ironically, it does so by returning to Antonio Gramsci. It argues that the multitude - or, for Gramsci 'civil soc

dc.contributor.authorEmerson, Guy
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:32:28Z
dc.identifier.issn1356-9775
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/75578
dc.description.abstractThis article expands upon the theory of post-hegemony so as to maintain the multitude as an operative political category alongside the State. Ironically, it does so by returning to Antonio Gramsci. It argues that the multitude - or, for Gramsci 'civil soc
dc.publisherBrunner - Routledge (US)
dc.sourceContemporary Politics
dc.titlePost-hegemony and Gramsci: a bridge too far?
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume19
dc.date.issued2013
local.identifier.absfor210308 - Latin American History
local.identifier.ariespublicationf5625xPUB4684
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationEmerson, Guy, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue4
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage427
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage440
local.identifier.doi10.1080/13569775.2013.835114
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T09:07:44Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84887994505
local.identifier.thomsonID000326672000005
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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