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Benefits and costs of deforestation by smallholders: Implications for forest conservation and climate policy

Cacho, Oscar; Milne, Sarah; Gonzalez, Ricardo; Tacconi, Luca

Description

Deforestation is a leading cause of biodiversity loss and an important source of global carbon emissions. This means that there are important synergies between climate policy and conservation policy. The highest rates of deforestation occur in tropical countries, where much of the land at the forest frontier is managed informally by smallholders and where governance systems tend to be weak. These features must be considered when designing policies to reduce emissions from deforestation such as...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorCacho, Oscar
dc.contributor.authorMilne, Sarah
dc.contributor.authorGonzalez, Ricardo
dc.contributor.authorTacconi, Luca
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:32:24Z
dc.identifier.issn0921-8009
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/75544
dc.description.abstractDeforestation is a leading cause of biodiversity loss and an important source of global carbon emissions. This means that there are important synergies between climate policy and conservation policy. The highest rates of deforestation occur in tropical countries, where much of the land at the forest frontier is managed informally by smallholders and where governance systems tend to be weak. These features must be considered when designing policies to reduce emissions from deforestation such as REDD. +. Deforestation is often accompanied by fires that release large amounts of carbon dioxide. These emissions are especially high in the case of peatlands which contain thick layers of carbon-rich matter. In this paper we derive marginal abatement cost (MAC) curves using data from a farmer survey in Sumatra, where rates of peatland deforestation are high. Comparing these results with farmers' stated willingness to accept payment not to clear forest to establish oil palm suggests that REDD. + policies may be more expensive than MAC estimates suggest The extent to which this is true depends on the types of soils being deforested.
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.sourceEcological Economics
dc.titleBenefits and costs of deforestation by smallholders: Implications for forest conservation and climate policy
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume107
dc.date.issued2014
local.identifier.absfor050200 - ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT
local.identifier.ariespublicationU3488905xPUB4668
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationCacho, Oscar, University of New England
local.contributor.affiliationMilne, Sarah, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationGonzalez, Ricardo, The University of the South Pacific
local.contributor.affiliationTacconi, Luca, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage321
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage332
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ecolecon.2014.09.012
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T09:07:06Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84907516522
local.identifier.thomsonID000345474800032
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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