Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Ancient and historic dispersals of sweet potato in Oceania

Denham, Timothy

Description

On his voyages across the Pacific, Captain James Cook encountered geographically disparate Polynesian societies, including those living on Easter Island, Hawai�i, and the north island of New Zealand. These far-flung communities cultivated a South American domesticate, the sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas). Subsequent debates concerning the timing and nature of the dispersals of sweet potato into and across the Pacific have proven contentious, including Thor Heyerdahl�s famous�Kon Tiki�voyage from...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorDenham, Timothy
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:30:59Z
dc.identifier.issn0027-8424
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/75093
dc.description.abstractOn his voyages across the Pacific, Captain James Cook encountered geographically disparate Polynesian societies, including those living on Easter Island, Hawai�i, and the north island of New Zealand. These far-flung communities cultivated a South American domesticate, the sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas). Subsequent debates concerning the timing and nature of the dispersals of sweet potato into and across the Pacific have proven contentious, including Thor Heyerdahl�s famous�Kon Tiki�voyage from South America to Easter Island (1). Archaeological research has now conclusively shown that the sweet potato was introduced to Central Polynesia by approximately A.D. 1200 to 1300 (2), most likely by Polynesian voyagers who reached South America and subsequently spread the crop to the widely dispersed islands of the Polynesian triangle (e.g., ref.�3). Now, Roullier et al. (4) use genetic analyses (chloroplast and nuclear microsatellites) of modern and historically collected herbaria samples to clarify longstanding questions concerning historical dispersals of sweet potato across the Pacific. In sum, their research confirms key aspects of the �tripartite hypothesis� for sweet potato dispersal, with major implications beyond Oceania.
dc.publisherNational Academy of Sciences (USA)
dc.sourcePNAS - Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
dc.subjectKeywords: DNA; archeology; chloroplast; crop; cultivar; DNA extraction; genetic analysis; nonhuman; note; Pacific islands; plant dispersal; priority journal; sweet potato; Humans; Ipomoea batatas
dc.titleAncient and historic dispersals of sweet potato in Oceania
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume110
dc.date.issued2013
local.identifier.absfor210303 - Australian History (excl. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander History)
local.identifier.ariespublicationf5625xPUB4464
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationDenham, Timothy, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue6
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1982
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage3
local.identifier.doi10.1073/pnas.1221569110
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T09:25:40Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84873466548
local.identifier.thomsonID000315209800017
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Denham_Ancient_and_historic_2013.pdf445.91 kBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator