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Frog ecology in modified Australian landscapes: a review.

Hazell, Donna

Description

Frog decline in Australia has often occurred where habitat is relatively intact. Habitat alteration and loss do, however, threaten many species. Widespread degradation of aquatic and terrestrial systems has occurred since European settlement, with only 6.4% of Australia's landmass reserved for conservation. But what do we know about how frogs use modified Australian landscapes? Do wildlife managers have the information required to ensure that frog habitat is considered in the management and...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHazell, Donna
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:30:29Z
dc.date.available2015-12-13T22:30:29Z
dc.identifier.issn1035-3712
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/74862
dc.description.abstractFrog decline in Australia has often occurred where habitat is relatively intact. Habitat alteration and loss do, however, threaten many species. Widespread degradation of aquatic and terrestrial systems has occurred since European settlement, with only 6.4% of Australia's landmass reserved for conservation. But what do we know about how frogs use modified Australian landscapes? Do wildlife managers have the information required to ensure that frog habitat is considered in the management and revegetation of these areas? This review examines published Australian research on frogs to determine knowledge on processes of habitat loss and degradation. Literature that informs landscape restoration and revegetation is also examined to determine whether the habitat needs of frogs are considered. While many threats associated with frog habitat loss and change have been identified there is little quantitative information on frog-habitat relationships in modified landscapes, habitat fragmentation or knowledge of the connectivity required between terrestrial and aquatic frog habitat. Without this information frogs have largely been ignored in efforts to revegetate and manage for the conservation of Australian biota outside reserves. Ecological frog research in modified landscapes is required to avoid land-management decisions and conservation strategies based on inappropriate assumptions of how biota respond to landscape change.
dc.publisherCSIRO Publishing
dc.sourceWildlife Research
dc.subjectKeywords: frog; habitat loss; human settlement; population decline; wildlife management; Australia; Anura; cellular organisms; Vertebrata
dc.titleFrog ecology in modified Australian landscapes: a review.
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume30
dc.date.issued2003
local.identifier.absfor050299 - Environmental Science and Management not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub4343
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationHazell, Donna, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage193
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage205
local.identifier.doi10.1071/WR02075
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T08:53:48Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-0042568885
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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