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Utilisation of Rep-PCR to track microbes in aerosols collected adjacent to their source, a saline lake in Victoria, Australia

Munday, Christopher; O'Loingsigh, Tadhg; Tapper, Nigel; De Deckker, Patrick; Allison, Gwen

Description

Dust storms are a major source of aerosolized bacteria, especially in the drought conditions experienced in Australia in the decade to 2009. The major aims of this project were to identify the culturable bacteria in environmental samples and to genetically fingerprint all isolates using repetitive element PCR (Rep-PCR) to investigate the possibility of tracking isolates from their source into the atmosphere. Four field trips were conducted to a dry lake in western Victoria, Australia to sample...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMunday, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorO'Loingsigh, Tadhg
dc.contributor.authorTapper, Nigel
dc.contributor.authorDe Deckker, Patrick
dc.contributor.authorAllison, Gwen
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:27:19Z
dc.identifier.issn0048-9697
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/73895
dc.description.abstractDust storms are a major source of aerosolized bacteria, especially in the drought conditions experienced in Australia in the decade to 2009. The major aims of this project were to identify the culturable bacteria in environmental samples and to genetically fingerprint all isolates using repetitive element PCR (Rep-PCR) to investigate the possibility of tracking isolates from their source into the atmosphere. Four field trips were conducted to a dry lake in western Victoria, Australia to sample aerosols and sediments. Aerosols were collected at heights up to 150m using vacuum pumps with filters attached to a tethered helium balloon, while corresponding sediments were collected in sterile polypropylene tubes. Isolates were cultivated on Tryptic Soy Agar, R2 Agar and Marine Agar, and grown in dark conditions at ambient temperature. By sequencing the 16S rRNA gene of 270 isolates, fifteen different bacterial families were identified, with both the aerosols and sediments dominated by the Bacillaceae family. Four sets of Rep-PCR primers were tested, with the ERIC and (GTG)5 primers proving to be the most suitable for fingerprinting the cultured taxa. Rep-PCR revealed very high strain diversity in the samples collected, however some strains were still able to be tracked from sediments up to 150m in height. This shows the potential of Rep-PCR, however very large reference databases would be required for the technique to be more useful.
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.sourceScience of the Total Environment
dc.subjectKeywords: Aeolian dusts; Atmospheric bacteria; Bioaerosols; Microbial ecology; Repetitive element PCR; Algae; Bacilli; Bacteria; Bacteriology; Lakes; Polypropylenes; Polysaccharides; RNA; Sedimentology; Sediments; Storms; Aerosols; helium; polypropylene; aerosol co Aeolian dust; Atmospheric bacteria; Bacillus; Bioaerosols; Microbial ecology; Repetitive element PCR
dc.titleUtilisation of Rep-PCR to track microbes in aerosols collected adjacent to their source, a saline lake in Victoria, Australia
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume450-451
dc.date.issued2013
local.identifier.absfor060504 - Microbial Ecology
local.identifier.ariespublicationf5625xPUB3878
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationMunday, Christopher, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationO'Loingsigh, Tadhg, Monash University
local.contributor.affiliationTapper, Nigel, Monash University
local.contributor.affiliationDe Deckker, Patrick, College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationAllison, Gwen, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage317
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage325
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.scitotenv.2013.02.028
local.identifier.absseo960199 - Air Quality not elsewhere classified
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T09:18:33Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84875302022
local.identifier.thomsonID000317879100036
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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