Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Microarray and Real-Time PCR Analysis of Gene Expression in the Honeybee Brain Following Caffeine Treatment

Kucharski, Robert; Maleszka, Ryszard

Description

To test the idea that caffeine might induce changes in gene expression in the honeybee brain, we contrasted the transcriptional profiles of control and caffeine-treated brains using high-throughput cDNA microarrays. Additional quantitative real-time PCR was performed on a subset of eight transcripts to visualize the temporal changes induced by caffeine. Genes that were significantly upregulated in caffeine-treated brains included those involved in synaptic signaling (GABA:Na symporter, dopamine...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorKucharski, Robert
dc.contributor.authorMaleszka, Ryszard
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:27:19Z
dc.identifier.issn0895-8696
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/73893
dc.description.abstractTo test the idea that caffeine might induce changes in gene expression in the honeybee brain, we contrasted the transcriptional profiles of control and caffeine-treated brains using high-throughput cDNA microarrays. Additional quantitative real-time PCR was performed on a subset of eight transcripts to visualize the temporal changes induced by caffeine. Genes that were significantly upregulated in caffeine-treated brains included those involved in synaptic signaling (GABA:Na symporter, dopamine D2R-like receptor, and synapsin), cytoskeletal modifications (kinesin and microtubule motors), protein translation (ribosomal protein RpL4, elongation factors), and calcium-dependent processes (calcium transporter, calmodulin-dependent cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase). In addition, our study uncovered a number of novel, caffeine-inducible genes that appear to be unique to the honeybee. Time-dependent profiling of caffeine-sensitive gene expression shows significant upregulation 1 h after treatment followed by moderate downregulation after 4 h with no additional changes occuring after 24 h. Our results provide initial evidence that the dopaminergic system and calcium exchange are the main targets of caffeine in the honeybee brain and suggest that molecular responses to caffeine in an invertebrate brain are similar to those in vertebrate organisms.
dc.publisherHumana Press Inc.
dc.sourceJournal of Molecular Neuroscience
dc.subjectKeywords: 4 aminobutyric acid; 4 aminobutyric acid sodium cotransporter; caffeine; calcium transporter; calmodulin dependent cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase; carrier protein; cotransporter; cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase; cytoskeleton protein; dopamine 2 r Apis mellifera genome; Behaviour; Caffeine; Dopamine receptor; Drug-induced gene expression
dc.titleMicroarray and Real-Time PCR Analysis of Gene Expression in the Honeybee Brain Following Caffeine Treatment
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume27
dc.date.issued2005
local.identifier.absfor060405 - Gene Expression (incl. Microarray and other genome-wide approaches)
local.identifier.absfor060805 - Animal Neurobiology
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub3877
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationKucharski, Robert, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationMaleszka, Ryszard, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage269
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage276
local.identifier.doi10.1385/JMN:27:3:269
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T08:30:32Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-27644445645
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Kucharski_Microarray_and_Real-Time_PCR_2005.pdf199.03 kBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator