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A systematic review and meta-analysis of the effects of Qigong and Tai Chi for depressive symptoms

Liu, Xin; Clark, Justin; Siskind, Dan; Williams, Gail; Byrne, Gerard J.; Yang, Jiao L.; Doi, Suhail

Description

Background: Qigong and Tai Chi are the two most popular traditional Chinese exercises, known as mind-body movement therapies. Previous studies suggest that Qigong and Tai Chi may be beneficial in reducing depressive symptoms. This was the first study to systematically review and compare the effects of Qigong and Tai Chi on depressive symptoms. Methods: A systematic search of six electronic databases was undertaken through to February 2014, for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) which reported...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorLiu, Xin
dc.contributor.authorClark, Justin
dc.contributor.authorSiskind, Dan
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Gail
dc.contributor.authorByrne, Gerard J.
dc.contributor.authorYang, Jiao L.
dc.contributor.authorDoi, Suhail
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:22:47Z
dc.identifier.issn0965-2299
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/72422
dc.description.abstractBackground: Qigong and Tai Chi are the two most popular traditional Chinese exercises, known as mind-body movement therapies. Previous studies suggest that Qigong and Tai Chi may be beneficial in reducing depressive symptoms. This was the first study to systematically review and compare the effects of Qigong and Tai Chi on depressive symptoms. Methods: A systematic search of six electronic databases was undertaken through to February 2014, for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) which reported depressive symptoms measured by a depressive symptom rating scale. The standardized mean difference in depressive symptoms score between Qigong or Tai Chi and a control group (at the end of follow-up) was extracted as a primary outcome. The secondary outcome was the standardized mean gain in symptom score (SMG) relative to the baseline from individual arms of the RCTs for various forms of care including Qigong, Tai Chi, usual care, other exercise, education and miscellaneous interventions. Results: Thirty studies with a total of 2328 participants (823 males and 1505 females) were included. A significant effect was found for the Qigong interventions (Cohen's d -0.48 95% CI -0.48 to -0.12; SMG -0.52, 95% CI -0.79 to -0.26). There was no significant effect seen for Tai Chi for the primary endpoint. No mean change in symptom scores were seen for Tai Chi, usual care, other exercises, education and the 'miscellaneous' group in pre-post assessment in single arms. The Qigong results were found to be robust in sensitivity analyses. Conclusions: Qigong appears to be beneficial for reducing depressive symptom severity. However, given the low quality of the included studies and the documented evidence of publication bias, these results should be viewed cautiously.
dc.publisherChurchill Livingstone
dc.sourceComplementary Therapies in Medicine
dc.titleA systematic review and meta-analysis of the effects of Qigong and Tai Chi for depressive symptoms
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume23
dc.date.issued2015
local.identifier.absfor110300 - CLINICAL SCIENCES
local.identifier.absfor111700 - PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB3237
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationLiu, Xin, University of Queensland
local.contributor.affiliationClark, Justin, Drug ARM Australasia
local.contributor.affiliationSiskind, Dan, School of Medicine and Metro South Addiction and Mental Health Service
local.contributor.affiliationWilliams, Gail, University of Queensland
local.contributor.affiliationByrne, Gerard J. , University of Queensland
local.contributor.affiliationYang, Jiao L., University of International Business and Economics
local.contributor.affiliationDoi, Suhail, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue4
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage516
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage534
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ctim.2015.05.001
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T07:58:55Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84939130885
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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