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The organizational citizenship behavior of IS personnel: Does organizational justice matter?

Chou, Tzy-Yuan; Chou, Seng-Cho T; Jiang, Jiunn-Yih (James); Klein, Gary

Description

In developing a successful IS development project today, good IS personnel are crucial. However, just achieving and maintaining their skills is not sufficient; they must contribute to the project in a meaningful fashion, including their supportive activity: organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). However, IS personnel have different motivational factors, informal behavior patterns, and exhibit OCBs different from those in other fields. In addition, projects present a different face than...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorChou, Tzy-Yuan
dc.contributor.authorChou, Seng-Cho T
dc.contributor.authorJiang, Jiunn-Yih (James)
dc.contributor.authorKlein, Gary
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:22:43Z
dc.identifier.issn0378-7206
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/72381
dc.description.abstractIn developing a successful IS development project today, good IS personnel are crucial. However, just achieving and maintaining their skills is not sufficient; they must contribute to the project in a meaningful fashion, including their supportive activity: organizational citizenship behavior (OCB). However, IS personnel have different motivational factors, informal behavior patterns, and exhibit OCBs different from those in other fields. In addition, projects present a different face than operations in an organization and alter the context of OCBs. This combination leads to a unique setting where the perceptions of equity by IS employees in project teams are unlikely to follow patterns established for functional operations. To determine if perceived equity can lead to desirable attitudes and behavior in this novel setting, we surveyed IS team members of development projects. Data from 298 respondents in 47 project teams indicated that equity, as measured by perceptions of justice, add to job commitment, which serves as a mediator between the justices and OCBs. Project leaders of teams with IS personnel must therefore work to improve the perception of equity in the distribution of rewards and treatment.
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.sourceInformation and Management
dc.subjectKeywords: Behavior patterns; Development project; Distributive justice; Functional operation; Interactional justice; Is development projects; Organizational citizenship behaviors; Procedural justice; Information systems; Project management; Human resource managemen Distributive justice; Information Systems Personnel; Interactional justice; Organizational citizenship behaviors; Procedural justice; Project Management
dc.titleThe organizational citizenship behavior of IS personnel: Does organizational justice matter?
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume50
dc.date.issued2013
local.identifier.absfor150308 - International Business
local.identifier.ariespublicationf5625xPUB3218
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationChou, Tzy-Yuan, National Taiwan University
local.contributor.affiliationChou, Seng-Cho T, National Taiwan University
local.contributor.affiliationJiang, Jiunn-Yih (James), College of Business and Economics, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationKlein, Gary, University of Colorado
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue2-Mar
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage105
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage111
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.im.2013.02.002
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T09:06:45Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84875480282
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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