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Psychological groups and political psychology: A response to Huddys Critical examination of social identity theory

Oakes, Penelope J.

Description

In a recent article in this journal, Leonie Huddy (2001) asks whether the social identity approach developed by Tajfel, Turner, and their collaborators can "advance the study of identity within political science" (p. 128). She concludes that "various shortcomings and omissions in its research program" (p. 128) hinder the application of the approach to political phenomena. This paper presents a response to Huddy's evaluation of the social identity approach. Several aspects of her account of...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorOakes, Penelope J.
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:19:23Z
dc.date.available2015-12-13T22:19:23Z
dc.identifier.issn0162-895X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/71767
dc.description.abstractIn a recent article in this journal, Leonie Huddy (2001) asks whether the social identity approach developed by Tajfel, Turner, and their collaborators can "advance the study of identity within political science" (p. 128). She concludes that "various shortcomings and omissions in its research program" (p. 128) hinder the application of the approach to political phenomena. This paper presents a response to Huddy's evaluation of the social identity approach. Several aspects of her account of social identity work are challenged, especially her suggestion that it ignores subjective aspects of group membership. The interpretation of the minimal group paradigm is discussed in detail, as are issues of identity choice, salience, and variations in identity strength. The treatment of groups as process in social identity theory and self-categorization theory is given particular emphasis.
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.sourcePolitical Psychology
dc.subjectKeywords: Identity salience; Identity strength; Political groups; Political psychology; Self-categorization; Social identity
dc.titlePsychological groups and political psychology: A response to Huddys Critical examination of social identity theory
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume23
dc.date.issued2002
local.identifier.absfor170113 - Social and Community Psychology
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub2869
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationOakes, Penelope J., College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue4
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage809
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage824
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T07:47:08Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-0036908920
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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