Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Social identity and negotiation: Subgroup representation and superordinate consensus

Eggins, Rachael; Haslam, S. Alexander; Reynolds, Katherine J

Description

Some models of conflict resolution propose that group membership be downplayed in negotiation because social categorization leads to ingroup bias. Challenging this view, this article argues that social conflict occurs partly as a collective attempt to establish a positive and distinct social identity. Restoration of this identity should therefore be important to negotiating groups. Two interactive studies (Ns = 104, 195) tested the effects over time of emphasizing identity-based group...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorEggins, Rachael
dc.contributor.authorHaslam, S. Alexander
dc.contributor.authorReynolds, Katherine J
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:19:20Z
dc.date.available2015-12-13T22:19:20Z
dc.identifier.issn0146-1672
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/71737
dc.description.abstractSome models of conflict resolution propose that group membership be downplayed in negotiation because social categorization leads to ingroup bias. Challenging this view, this article argues that social conflict occurs partly as a collective attempt to establish a positive and distinct social identity. Restoration of this identity should therefore be important to negotiating groups. Two interactive studies (Ns = 104, 195) tested the effects over time of emphasizing identity-based group boundaries prior to negotiation with another group. Results indicated that where group members had the opportunity to interact with ingroup members (Study 1) or within a group (Study 2) prior to a superordinate negotiation, they consistently identified more at the subcategory level but were also more satisfied with the negotiation process. Evidence from the second study suggests that these effects were mediated by the development of a superordinate identity.
dc.publisherSage Publications Inc
dc.sourcePersonality and Social Psychology Bulletin
dc.titleSocial identity and negotiation: Subgroup representation and superordinate consensus
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume28
dc.date.issued2002
local.identifier.absfor170113 - Social and Community Psychology
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub2855
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationEggins, Rachael, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationHaslam, S. Alexander, University of Exeter
local.contributor.affiliationReynolds, Katherine J, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage887
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage899
local.identifier.doi10.1177/01467202028007003
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T07:46:27Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-0347911716
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

There are no files associated with this item.


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator