Skip navigation
Skip navigation

The costs of avian brood parasitism explain variation in egg rejection behaviour in hosts

Medina, Iliana; Langmore, Naomi

Description

Many bird species can reject foreign eggs from their nests. This behaviour is thought to have evolved in response to brood parasites, birds that lay their eggs in the nest of other species. However, not all hosts of brood parasites evict parasitic eggs. In this study, we collate data from egg rejection experiments on 198 species, and perform comparative analyses to understand the conditions under which egg rejection evolves. We found evidence, we believe for the first time in a large-scale...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMedina, Iliana
dc.contributor.authorLangmore, Naomi
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:19:14Z
dc.identifier.issn1744-9561
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/71694
dc.description.abstractMany bird species can reject foreign eggs from their nests. This behaviour is thought to have evolved in response to brood parasites, birds that lay their eggs in the nest of other species. However, not all hosts of brood parasites evict parasitic eggs. In this study, we collate data from egg rejection experiments on 198 species, and perform comparative analyses to understand the conditions under which egg rejection evolves. We found evidence, we believe for the first time in a large-scale comparative analysis, that (i) non-current host species have rejection rates as high as current hosts, (ii) egg rejection is more likely to evolve when the parasite is relatively large compared with its host and (iii) egg rejection is more likely to evolve when the parasite chick evicts all the host eggs from the nest, such as in cuckoos. Our results suggest that the interactions between brood parasites and their hosts have driven the evolution of egg rejection and that variation in the costs inflicted by parasites is fundamental to explaining why only some host species evolve egg rejection.
dc.publisherRoyal Society of London
dc.sourceBiology Letters
dc.titleThe costs of avian brood parasitism explain variation in egg rejection behaviour in hosts
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume11
dc.date.issued2015
local.identifier.absfor060201 - Behavioural Ecology
local.identifier.absfor060304 - Ethology and Sociobiology
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB2836
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationMedina, Iliana, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationLangmore, Naomi, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue7
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage4
local.identifier.doi10.1098/rsbl.2015.0296
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T07:45:57Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84937019605
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Medina_The_costs_of_avian_brood_2015.pdf422.55 kBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator