Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Virus epidemics can lead to a population-wide spread of intragenomic parasites in a previously parasite-free asexual population

Jalasvuori, Matti; Lehtonen, Jussi

Description

Sexual reproduction is problematic to explain due to its costs, most notably the twofold cost of sex. Yet, sex has been suggested to be favourable in the presence of proliferating intragenomic parasites given that sexual recombination provides a mechanism to confine the accumulation of deleterious mutations. Kraaijeveld et al. compared recently the accumulation of transposons in sexually and asexually reproducing lines of the same species, the parasitoid wasp Leptopilina clavipes. They...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorJalasvuori, Matti
dc.contributor.authorLehtonen, Jussi
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:17:31Z
dc.identifier.issn0962-1083
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/71183
dc.description.abstractSexual reproduction is problematic to explain due to its costs, most notably the twofold cost of sex. Yet, sex has been suggested to be favourable in the presence of proliferating intragenomic parasites given that sexual recombination provides a mechanism to confine the accumulation of deleterious mutations. Kraaijeveld et al. compared recently the accumulation of transposons in sexually and asexually reproducing lines of the same species, the parasitoid wasp Leptopilina clavipes. They discovered that within asexually reproducing wasps, the number of gypsy-like retrotransposons was increased fourfold, whereas other retrotransposons were not. Interestingly, gypsy-like retrotransposons are closely related to retroviruses. Endogenous retroviruses are retroviruses that have integrated to the germ line cells and are inherited thereafter vertically. They can also replicate within the genome similarly to retrotransposons as well as form virus particles and infect previously uninfected cells. This highlights the possibility that endogenous retroviruses could play a role in the evolution of sexual reproduction. Here, we show with an individual-based computational model that a virus epidemic within a previously parasite-free asexual population may establish a new intragenomic parasite to the population. Moreover and in contrast to other transposons, the possibility of endogenous viruses to maintain a virus epidemic and simultaneously provide resistance to individuals carrying active endogenous viruses selects for the presence of active intragenomic parasites in the population despite their deleterious effects. Our results suggest that the viral nature of certain intragenomic parasites should be taken into account when sex and its benefits are being considered.
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.sourceMolecular Ecology
dc.titleVirus epidemics can lead to a population-wide spread of intragenomic parasites in a previously parasite-free asexual population
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume23
dc.date.issued2014
local.identifier.absfor060506 - Virology
local.identifier.ariespublicationU3488905xPUB2596
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationJalasvuori, Matti, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationLehtonen, Jussi, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue5
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage987
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage991
local.identifier.doi10.1111/mec.12662
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T07:34:54Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84896712747
local.identifier.thomsonID000331851900001
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Jalasvuori_Virus_epidemics_can_lead_to_a_2014.pdf556.54 kBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator