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Bryophyte persistence following major fire in eucalypt forest of southern Australia

Pharo, E.J.; Meagher, D A; Lindenmayer, David B

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The significance of variation in fire severity is not well understood for bryophyte species richness and composition. This is despite fire being a major factor in determining bryophyte richness and composition in temperate forests. We documented the species richness of mosses and liverworts in 42 sites of Mountain Ash (Eucalyptus regnans) forest in eastern Australia. We compared two age classes: long unburned stands and 72year old stands following a major fire in February 2009. Within these two...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorPharo, E.J.
dc.contributor.authorMeagher, D A
dc.contributor.authorLindenmayer, David B
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:17:27Z
dc.identifier.issn0378-1127
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/71135
dc.description.abstractThe significance of variation in fire severity is not well understood for bryophyte species richness and composition. This is despite fire being a major factor in determining bryophyte richness and composition in temperate forests. We documented the species richness of mosses and liverworts in 42 sites of Mountain Ash (Eucalyptus regnans) forest in eastern Australia. We compared two age classes: long unburned stands and 72year old stands following a major fire in February 2009. Within these two age classes, we surveyed sites of contrasting fire severity: (1) unburned, (2) subject to moderate severity fire (intact canopy) and (3) subject to high severity fire (burned canopy). At each site, we surveyed bryophytes in 10m×100m transects, which was large enough to include a variety of microhabitats. Roughly 60% of the variation in species richness (r2=0.61, p<0.001) and composition (R=0.57, p<0.001) was explained by fire severity. High severity fire removed all bryophytes and only pioneer species were present 2years later. In contrast, the moderate severity fire sites were often species rich because they harboured pioneer bryophytes and species associated with long unburned forest. A key finding was the importance of small unburned patches that contained understorey trees and logs for boosting bryophyte richness. Practices such as salvage logging that remove biological legacies are inconsistent with the conservation of bryophyte diversity in this landscape.
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.sourceForest Ecology and Management
dc.subjectKeywords: Biological legacies; Bryophyte; Eastern Australia; Eucalypt forest; Succession; Fires; Plants (botany); Substrates; Surveys; Forestry; evergreen forest; fire behavior; identification key; landscape; liverwort; moss; species richness; stand structure; temp Biological legacies; Bryophyte; Eastern Australia; Eucalypt forest; Substrate; Succession
dc.titleBryophyte persistence following major fire in eucalypt forest of southern Australia
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume296
dc.date.issued2013
local.identifier.absfor050202 - Conservation and Biodiversity
local.identifier.absfor050211 - Wildlife and Habitat Management
local.identifier.ariespublicationf5625xPUB2572
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationPharo, E.J., University of Tasmania
local.contributor.affiliationMeagher, D A, University of Melbourne
local.contributor.affiliationLindenmayer, David, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage24
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage32
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.foreco.2013.01.018
local.identifier.absseo960806 - Forest and Woodlands Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T09:00:28Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84874702766
local.identifier.thomsonID000318210900003
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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