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An Australian survey of cognitive health beliefs, intentions, and behaviours through the adult life course

Hosking, Diane; Sargent-Cox, Kerry; Anstey, Kaarin

Description

Objective: Information is required regarding cognitive health beliefs and behaviours from across the life in order to inform the design of interventions to optimise cognitive health and reduce the risk of cognitive impairment. Methods: A survey of Australian adults aged 20-89 was administered via Computer Assisted Telephone Interviewing (CATI) software to respondents recruited by random digit dialling (N = 900). Socio-demographic and self-reported health information was collected to investigate...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHosking, Diane
dc.contributor.authorSargent-Cox, Kerry
dc.contributor.authorAnstey, Kaarin
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:17:26Z
dc.identifier.issn2211-3355
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/71128
dc.description.abstractObjective: Information is required regarding cognitive health beliefs and behaviours from across the life in order to inform the design of interventions to optimise cognitive health and reduce the risk of cognitive impairment. Methods: A survey of Australian adults aged 20-89 was administered via Computer Assisted Telephone Interviewing (CATI) software to respondents recruited by random digit dialling (N = 900). Socio-demographic and self-reported health information was collected to investigate associations with cognitive health responses. Results: Alcohol abuse was nominated by the highest proportion of respondents (34.3%) as detrimental for brain health. Fewer than 5% nominated elevated cholesterol, blood pressure, obesity, poor education, or ageing. The most frequently endorsed protective activity was socialising (70%). Socio-demographic factors predicted responses. Age-group differences were apparent in the proportions nominating alcohol (X2=24.2; p<.001), drugs (X2=56.8; p<.001), smoking (X2=13.1; p=.001), nutrition (X2=20.4; p<.001), and mental activity (X2=12.8; p=.002) as relevant to brain health. Activities undertaken for cognitive benefit also differed by age. Across all ages the perceived benefit of activities was not supported by intentions to undertake activities. Conclusions: Interventions are needed to inform and motivate people across the life-course to undertake behaviours specifically to optimise their cognitive health.
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.rightsAuthor/s retain copyright
dc.sourcePreventive Medicine Reports
dc.titleAn Australian survey of cognitive health beliefs, intentions, and behaviours through the adult life course
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume2
dc.date.issued2015
local.identifier.absfor170100 - PSYCHOLOGY
local.identifier.absfor110300 - CLINICAL SCIENCES
local.identifier.absfor111700 - PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB2570
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationHosking, Diane, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationSargent-Cox, Kerry, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationAnstey, Kaarin, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage498
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage504
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.pmedr.2015.06.008
dc.date.updated2015-12-11T07:34:12Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84931271139
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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