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Australian Climate, Energy and Water Policies: Conflicts and synergies

Pittock, Jamie; Hussey, Karen; McGlennon, Samuel

Description

Responding to the threat of climate change, conserving freshwater ecosystems and securing adequate energy and water supplies are among the greatest challenges facing modern societies. Yet recognition of the interdependencies between climate, energy and water policy-with resulting synergies and trade-offs-remains limited, leaving societies and governments alike vulnerable to the dangers of conflicted or unintended policy outcomes from sectoral decisions. In this paper, we analyse current...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorPittock, Jamie
dc.contributor.authorHussey, Karen
dc.contributor.authorMcGlennon, Samuel
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:17:11Z
dc.identifier.issn0004-9182
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/71020
dc.description.abstractResponding to the threat of climate change, conserving freshwater ecosystems and securing adequate energy and water supplies are among the greatest challenges facing modern societies. Yet recognition of the interdependencies between climate, energy and water policy-with resulting synergies and trade-offs-remains limited, leaving societies and governments alike vulnerable to the dangers of conflicted or unintended policy outcomes from sectoral decisions. In this paper, we analyse current Australian climate, energy and water policies to identify the risks of perverse outcomes between the three policy sectors. In doing so we categorise the conflicts and synergies between particular energy generation, carbon sequestration and water supply policies to improve understandings of the challenges facing decision makers in Australia and internationally. Four types of interventions are identified that would enable integration and optimisation of policies, namely: better cross-sectoral knowledge to inform decisions; the identification of technologies with co-benefits; markets with broader cross-sectoral participation (including linking water and carbon markets); and better-integrated governance institutions.
dc.publisherCarfax Publishing, Taylor & Francis Group
dc.sourceAustralian Geographer
dc.subjectKeywords: adaptive management; carbon sequestration; climate change; decision making; electricity generation; energy policy; environmental policy; water planning; water supply; Australia Adaptation; climate change; policy integration; renewable energy; sequestration; water policy
dc.titleAustralian Climate, Energy and Water Policies: Conflicts and synergies
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume44
dc.date.issued2013
local.identifier.absfor160507 - Environment Policy
local.identifier.ariespublicationf5625xPUB2517
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationPittock, Jamie, University of Sydney US Studies Centre
local.contributor.affiliationHussey, Karen, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationMcGlennon, Samuel, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage3
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage22
local.identifier.doi10.1080/00049182.2013.765345
local.identifier.absseo960699 - Environmental and Natural Resource Evaluation not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.absseo960799 - Environmental Policy, Legislation and Standards not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.absseo940110 - Environmental Services
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T09:00:02Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84874544524
local.identifier.thomsonID000315352300001
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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