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Utilisation of multidisciplinary services for diabetes care in the rural setting

Madden, Jessica; Barnard, Amanda; Owen, Cathy

Description

Objective: To quantify utilisation of allied health care services by diabetics in rural NSW and explore reasons for any underutilisation. Design: Self-administered mail survey of 268 patients with diagnosed diabetes identified from practice registers. Setting: Two rural general practices. Participants: One hundred seventeen respondents with diabetes. Main outcome measure: Annual frequency of visits to allied health practitioners. Results: In the last year, 40.2% of patients had seen a diabetes...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMadden, Jessica
dc.contributor.authorBarnard, Amanda
dc.contributor.authorOwen, Cathy
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-13T22:16:21Z
dc.identifier.issn1038-5282
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/70818
dc.description.abstractObjective: To quantify utilisation of allied health care services by diabetics in rural NSW and explore reasons for any underutilisation. Design: Self-administered mail survey of 268 patients with diagnosed diabetes identified from practice registers. Setting: Two rural general practices. Participants: One hundred seventeen respondents with diabetes. Main outcome measure: Annual frequency of visits to allied health practitioners. Results: In the last year, 40.2% of patients had seen a diabetes educator (DE), 21.4% a dietitian and 47% a podiatrist. However, 25-40% of patients had never used each of the services. Reasons for nonutilisation were non-referral (35.9-68.0%) and lack of perceived need (40.6-59.0%). One third of patients who had not seen a DE in the last year thought their 'general practitioner (GP) provides a similar service'. However, mean annual GP visits (5.6) were significantly lower than urban and rural comparisons. Patients with formal management plans were, in the last year, twice as likely to have seen a DE and podiatrist, and reported two extra visits to their GP compared to those without. Conclusions: Rates of allied health service utilisation were not significantly lower than urban rates; however, there is room for increased uptake of multidisciplinary services. Patients who do not access these services may expect their GP to fulfil multiple roles within a limited number of visits and may not understand the role of other practitioners. Where allied health services are available locally, utilisation may be improved by increasing use of management plans and fostering awareness of the role of allied health practitioners in diabetes management.
dc.publisherBlackwell Science Asia
dc.sourceAustralian Journal of Rural Health
dc.subjectKeywords: Allied health; Diabetes; Patient issue; Rural health; Rural health service delivery
dc.titleUtilisation of multidisciplinary services for diabetes care in the rural setting
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume21
dc.date.issued2013
local.identifier.absfor110300 - CLINICAL SCIENCES
local.identifier.absfor111700 - PUBLIC HEALTH AND HEALTH SERVICES
local.identifier.ariespublicationf5625xPUB2428
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationMadden, Jessica, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBarnard, Amanda, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationOwen, Cathy, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage28
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage34
local.identifier.doi10.1111/ajr.12006
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T08:58:23Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84873466654
local.identifier.thomsonID000314593200006
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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