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Current work and future possibilities for the management of severe influenza: Using immunomodulatory agents that target the host response

Alleva, Lisa; Gualano, Rosa C; Clark, Ian A

Description

In this article, we argue the case that the excessive inflammatory response seen in severe influenza contributes to severe illness and death by disabling oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria, leading to reduced cellular levels of ATP. When the mitochondrial permeability transition is induced, cells cannot die by apoptosis in the face of reduced ATP levels, because apoptosis depends upon ATP availability, and so cells undergo necrosis. Cellular necrosis causes release of proinflammatory...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorAlleva, Lisa
dc.contributor.authorGualano, Rosa C
dc.contributor.authorClark, Ian A
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:36:37Z
dc.identifier.issn1746-0794
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/70216
dc.description.abstractIn this article, we argue the case that the excessive inflammatory response seen in severe influenza contributes to severe illness and death by disabling oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria, leading to reduced cellular levels of ATP. When the mitochondrial permeability transition is induced, cells cannot die by apoptosis in the face of reduced ATP levels, because apoptosis depends upon ATP availability, and so cells undergo necrosis. Cellular necrosis causes release of proinflammatory molecules such as high mobility group box 1 protein and mitochondrial DNA, and these could contribute to the prolongation of inflammation during severe influenza. With these concepts in mind, we discuss how immunomodulatory agents that prevent cellular necrosis (by restoring mitochondrial function) and limit inflammation are promising influenza treatments.
dc.publisherFuture Science Group
dc.sourceFuture Virology
dc.subjectKeywords: adenosine triphosphate; flavonoid; gemfibrozil; glycyrrhizic acid; high mobility group B1 protein; immunomodulating agent; mitochondrial DNA; phytoestrogen; pioglitazone; plant extract; polyphenol; resveratrol; rosiglitazone; simvastatin; telmisartan; 200 complementary and alternative medicine; fibrate; glitazone; glycyrrhizin; H1N1 pandemic; H5N1; HMGB1; inflammation; influenza; mitochondria; statin
dc.titleCurrent work and future possibilities for the management of severe influenza: Using immunomodulatory agents that target the host response
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume6
dc.date.issued2011
local.identifier.absfor110309 - Infectious Diseases
local.identifier.ariespublicationf2965xPUB2255
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationAlleva, Lisa, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationGualano, Rosa C, University of Melbourne
local.contributor.affiliationClark, Ian A, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue7
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage843
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage854
local.identifier.doi10.2217/fvl.11.51
local.identifier.absseo920109 - Infectious Diseases
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T08:23:58Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-79960413119
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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