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An epidemiological overview of the relationship between hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer

Salagame, Usha; Banks, Emily; Canfell, Karen

Description

Large-scale randomized clinical trials and observational studies have consistently found that use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) increases the risk of breast cancer. More recently, ecological studies have shown correlations between dramatic reductions in use of HRT in many countries, and declines in the rates of breast cancer in older women. Meta-analyses of data from the trials and observational studies show that the increase in breast cancer risk is greater for combined...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorSalagame, Usha
dc.contributor.authorBanks, Emily
dc.contributor.authorCanfell, Karen
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:35:34Z
dc.identifier.issn1744-6651
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/69908
dc.description.abstractLarge-scale randomized clinical trials and observational studies have consistently found that use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) increases the risk of breast cancer. More recently, ecological studies have shown correlations between dramatic reductions in use of HRT in many countries, and declines in the rates of breast cancer in older women. Meta-analyses of data from the trials and observational studies show that the increase in breast cancer risk is greater for combined estrogen-progestin therapies compared with estrogen alone; that for both types of preparation, breast cancer risk increases with duration of use; and that the risks decrease relatively quickly after cessation of use. For both estrogen-only and combined therapies, the risk of breast cancer is higher if therapy is initiated close to the time of the menopause, relative to the risks in women starting HRT later. Most drug regulatory authorities currently recommend that HRT be prescribed only to fully informed women who have moderate-to-severe menopausal symptoms, for the shortest duration possible; and it is recommended that the need for therapy be reviewed at least every 6-12 months.
dc.publisherExpert Reviews
dc.sourceExpert Review of Endocrinology and Metabolism
dc.subjectKeywords: estrogen; estrogen receptor; gestagen; body mass; breast cancer; cancer diagnosis; cancer epidemiology; cancer hormone therapy; cancer incidence; cancer risk; cancer screening; drug formulation; histopathology; human; mammography; menopause; priority jour combined estrogen-progestin therapy; estrogen; hormone replacement therapy; medroxyprogesterone acetate; progestins
dc.titleAn epidemiological overview of the relationship between hormone replacement therapy and breast cancer
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume6
dc.date.issued2011
local.identifier.absfor060411 - Population, Ecological and Evolutionary Genetics
local.identifier.ariespublicationf2965xPUB2156
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationSalagame, Usha, Cancer Council NSW
local.contributor.affiliationBanks, Emily, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationCanfell, Karen, Cancer Counsil NSW
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage397
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage409
local.identifier.doi10.1586/eem.11.31
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T08:22:36Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-79956113341
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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