Skip navigation
Skip navigation

Evaluating the status of species using Indigenous knowledge: Novel evidence for major native mammal declines in northern Australia

Ziembicki, Mark; Woinarski, J.C.Z.; Mackey, Brendan

Description

A small series of recent monitoring studies has reported major declines for many native mammal species in localised regions in northern Australia. However, the broader spatial context of these studies is uncertain. This study aims to assess the extent and timing of change in mammal status across a broad area of northern Australia (the monsoonal tropics of the Northern Territory). Indigenous information about terrestrial native mammal fauna (excluding bats) was compiled from a large series of...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorZiembicki, Mark
dc.contributor.authorWoinarski, J.C.Z.
dc.contributor.authorMackey, Brendan
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:35:02Z
dc.identifier.issn0006-3207
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/69680
dc.description.abstractA small series of recent monitoring studies has reported major declines for many native mammal species in localised regions in northern Australia. However, the broader spatial context of these studies is uncertain. This study aims to assess the extent and timing of change in mammal status across a broad area of northern Australia (the monsoonal tropics of the Northern Territory). Indigenous information about terrestrial native mammal fauna (excluding bats) was compiled from a large series of interviews conducted across Indigenous communities. A collection of mammal skins was used to help facilitate discussions and verify identifications. The resulting information was analysed with non-parametric statistics to test for changes in mammal status across different time periods, between different regions, and between different groups of mammal species. Declines were reported as extending from the earliest memory of Indigenous participants, but the rate of decline has increased recently. These changes were reported across all five regions within the broad study area and were greater for " critical weight range" species than for other species. Indigenous participants suggested several factors were associated with the changing status of species. The study's results reveal a pattern of widespread decline in the mammal fauna of the monsoonal tropics of northern Australia, thereby corroborating the conclusions of recent more local wildlife monitoring studies. The study also demonstrates the value and capability of Indigenous ecological knowledge to complement and corroborate more intensive and local scientific studies. The results reinforce concern for the conservation status of the mammal fauna of northern Australia.
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.sourceBiological Conservation
dc.subjectKeywords: conservation management; conservation status; endangered species; indigenous knowledge; mammal; native species; population decline; skin; wildlife management; Australia; Mammalia Aboriginal knowledge; Conservation; Ecological monitoring; Threatened species; Traditional ecological knowledge
dc.titleEvaluating the status of species using Indigenous knowledge: Novel evidence for major native mammal declines in northern Australia
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume157
dc.date.issued2013
local.identifier.absfor050201 - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Environmental Knowledge
local.identifier.ariespublicationf5625xPUB2091
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationZiembicki, Mark, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationWoinarski, J.C.Z., NT Department of Natural Resources, Environment and the Arts, Palmerston
local.contributor.affiliationMackey, Brendan, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage78
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage92
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.biocon.2012.07.004
local.identifier.absseo960899 - Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity of environments not elsewhere classified
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T08:54:03Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84870357947
local.identifier.thomsonID000316651200010
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Ziembicki_Evaluating_the_status_of_2013.pdf1.12 MBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator