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Source population characteristics affect heterosis following genetic rescue of fragmented plant populations

Pickup, Melinda; Field, David L.; Rowell, David M; Young, Andrew

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Understanding the relative importance of heterosis and outbreeding depression over multiple generations is a key question in evolutionary biology and is essential for identifying appropriate genetic sources for population and ecosystem restoration. Here we use 2455 experimental crosses between 12 population pairs of the rare perennial plant Rutidosis leptorrhynchoides (Asteraceae) to investigate the multi-generational (F1, F2, F3) fitness outcomes of inter-population hybridization. We detected...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorPickup, Melinda
dc.contributor.authorField, David L.
dc.contributor.authorRowell, David M
dc.contributor.authorYoung, Andrew
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:34:57Z
dc.identifier.issn0962-8452
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/69650
dc.description.abstractUnderstanding the relative importance of heterosis and outbreeding depression over multiple generations is a key question in evolutionary biology and is essential for identifying appropriate genetic sources for population and ecosystem restoration. Here we use 2455 experimental crosses between 12 population pairs of the rare perennial plant Rutidosis leptorrhynchoides (Asteraceae) to investigate the multi-generational (F1, F2, F3) fitness outcomes of inter-population hybridization. We detected no evidence of outbreeding depression, with inter-population hybrids and backcrosses showing either similar fitness or significant heterosis for fitness components across the three generations. Variation in heterosis among population pairs was best explained by characteristics of the foreign source or home population, and was greatest when the source population was large, with high genetic diversity and low inbreeding, and the home population was small and inbred. Our results indicate that the primary consideration for maximizing progeny fitness following population augmentation or restoration is the use of seed from large, genetically diverse populations.
dc.publisherRoyal Society of London
dc.sourceProceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B: Biological Sciences
dc.subjectKeywords: conservation genetics; dicotyledon; genetic differentiation; genetic resource; heterosis; hybridization; inbreeding depression; outcrossing; perennial plant; population size; rare species; restoration ecology; Asteraceae; Rutidosis leptorhynchoides Conservation; Genetic rescue; Heterosis; Inbreeding; Outbreeding depression; Population size
dc.titleSource population characteristics affect heterosis following genetic rescue of fragmented plant populations
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume280
dc.date.issued2012
local.identifier.absfor060499 - Genetics not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.ariespublicationf5625xPUB2082
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationPickup, Melinda, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationField, David L., CSIRO Plant Industry
local.contributor.affiliationRowell, David M, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationYoung, Andrew, CSIRO Plant Industry
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1750
local.identifier.doi10.1098/rspb.2012.2058
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T08:53:57Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84869778044
local.identifier.thomsonID000311943100012
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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