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Computational design of a carbon nanotube fluorofullerene biosensor

Hilder, Tamsyn; Pace, Ronald; Chung, Shin-Ho

Description

Carbon nanotubes offer exciting opportunities for devising highly-sensitive detectors of specific molecules in biology and the environment. Detection limits as low as 10-11 M have already been achieved using nanotube-based sensors. We propose the design of a biosensor comprised of functionalized carbon nanotube pores embedded in a silicon-nitride or other membrane, fluorofullerene-Fragment antigen-binding (Fab fragment) conjugates, and polymer beads with complementary Fab fragments. We show by...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHilder, Tamsyn
dc.contributor.authorPace, Ronald
dc.contributor.authorChung, Shin-Ho
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:31:30Z
dc.identifier.issn1424-8220
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/68654
dc.description.abstractCarbon nanotubes offer exciting opportunities for devising highly-sensitive detectors of specific molecules in biology and the environment. Detection limits as low as 10-11 M have already been achieved using nanotube-based sensors. We propose the design of a biosensor comprised of functionalized carbon nanotube pores embedded in a silicon-nitride or other membrane, fluorofullerene-Fragment antigen-binding (Fab fragment) conjugates, and polymer beads with complementary Fab fragments. We show by using molecular and stochastic dynamics that conduction through the (9, 9) exohydrogenated carbon nanotubes is 20 times larger than through the Ion Channel Switch ICSTM biosensor, and fluorofullerenes block the nanotube entrance with a dissociation constant as low as 37 pM. Under normal operating conditions and in the absence of analyte, fluorofullerenes block the nanotube pores and the polymer beads float around in the reservoir. When analyte is injected into the reservoir the Fab fragments attached to the fluorofullerene and polymer bead crosslink to the analyte. The drag of the much larger polymer bead then acts to pull the fluorofullerene from the nanotube entrance, thereby allowing the flow of monovalent cations across the membrane. Assuming a tight seal is formed between the two reservoirs, such a biosensor would be able to detect one channel opening and thus one molecule of analyte making it a highly sensitive detection design.
dc.publisherMDPI Publishing
dc.rightsAuthor/s retain copyright
dc.sourceSensors
dc.subjectKeywords: Computational design; Dissociation constant; Fluorofullerenes; Functionalized carbon nanotubes; Highly sensitive detections; Nanotube-based sensors; Normal operating conditions; Proof of concept; Carbon nanotubes; Design; Dissociation; Molecular dynamics; Biosensor; Carbon nanotube; Distributional molecular dynamics; Fluorofullerene; Molecular dynamics; Proof-of-concept
dc.titleComputational design of a carbon nanotube fluorofullerene biosensor
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume12
dc.date.issued2012
local.identifier.absfor100703 - Nanobiotechnology
local.identifier.absfor030799 - Theoretical and Computational Chemistry not elsewhere classified
local.identifier.ariespublicationf5625xPUB1789
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationHilder, Tamsyn, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationPace, Ronald, College of Physical and Mathematical Sciences, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationChung, Shin-Ho, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue10
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage13720
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage13735
local.identifier.doi10.3390/s121013720
local.identifier.absseo970102 - Expanding Knowledge in the Physical Sciences
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T08:50:54Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84868251197
local.identifier.thomsonID000310507800043
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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