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Do invasive species show higher phenotypic plasticity than native species and, if so, is it adaptive? A meta-analysis

Davidson, Amy; Jennions, Michael; Nicotra, Adrienne

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Do invasive plant species have greater phenotypic plasticity than non-invasive species? And, if so, how does this affect their fitness relative to native, non-invasive species? What role might this play in plant invasions? To answer these long-standing questions, we conducted a meta-analysis using data from 75 invasive/non-invasive species pairs. Our analysis shows that invasive species demonstrate significantly higher phenotypic plasticity than non-invasive species. To examine the adaptive...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorDavidson, Amy
dc.contributor.authorJennions, Michael
dc.contributor.authorNicotra, Adrienne
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:31:18Z
dc.identifier.issn1461-023X
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/68560
dc.description.abstractDo invasive plant species have greater phenotypic plasticity than non-invasive species? And, if so, how does this affect their fitness relative to native, non-invasive species? What role might this play in plant invasions? To answer these long-standing questions, we conducted a meta-analysis using data from 75 invasive/non-invasive species pairs. Our analysis shows that invasive species demonstrate significantly higher phenotypic plasticity than non-invasive species. To examine the adaptive benefit of this plasticity, we plotted fitness proxies against measures of plasticity in several growth, morphological and physiological traits to test whether greater plasticity is associated with an improvement in estimated fitness. Invasive species were nearly always more plastic in their response to greater resource availability than non-invasives but this plasticity was only sometimes associated with a fitness benefit. Intriguingly, non-invasive species maintained greater fitness homoeostasis when comparing growth between low and average resource availability. Our finding that invasive species are more plastic in a variety of traits but that non-invasive species respond just as well, if not better, when resources are limiting, has interesting implications for predicting responses to global change.
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.sourceEcology Letters
dc.subjectKeywords: adaptation; climate change; comparative study; environmental factor; fitness; global change; invasive species; meta-analysis; morphology; native species; phenotypic plasticity; physiological response; plant community; resource availability; weed; adaptati Adaptive; Alien; Climate change; Environmental gradient; Indigenous; Resource; Weed
dc.titleDo invasive species show higher phenotypic plasticity than native species and, if so, is it adaptive? A meta-analysis
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume14
dc.date.issued2011
local.identifier.absfor060203 - Ecological Physiology
local.identifier.ariespublicationf2965xPUB1756
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationDavidson, Amy, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationJennions, Michael, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationNicotra, Adrienne, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue4
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage419
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage431
local.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1461-0248.2011.01596.x
local.identifier.absseo960499 - Control of Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species not elsewhere classified
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T08:16:47Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-79952500697
local.identifier.thomsonID000288211000012
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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