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The evolution of acceptance and tolerance in hosts of avian brood parasites

Medina, Iliana; Langmore, Naomi

Description

Avian brood parasites lay their eggs in the nests of their hosts, which rear the parasite's progeny. The costs of parasitism have selected for the evolution of defence strategies in many host species. Most research has focused on resistance strategies, where hosts minimize the number of successful parasitism events using defences such as mobbing of adult brood parasites or rejection of parasite eggs. However, many hosts do not exhibit resistance. Here we explore why some hosts accept parasite...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorMedina, Iliana
dc.contributor.authorLangmore, Naomi
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:30:30Z
dc.identifier.issn1464-7931
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/68228
dc.description.abstractAvian brood parasites lay their eggs in the nests of their hosts, which rear the parasite's progeny. The costs of parasitism have selected for the evolution of defence strategies in many host species. Most research has focused on resistance strategies, where hosts minimize the number of successful parasitism events using defences such as mobbing of adult brood parasites or rejection of parasite eggs. However, many hosts do not exhibit resistance. Here we explore why some hosts accept parasite eggs in their nests and how this is related to the virulence of the parasite. We also explore the extent to which acceptance of parasites can be explained by the evolution of tolerance; a strategy in which the host accepts the parasite but adjusts its life history or other traits to minimize the costs of parasitism. We review examples of tolerance in hosts of brood parasites (such as modifications to clutch size and multi-broodedness), and utilize the literature on host-pathogen interactions and plant herbivory to analyse the prevalence of each type of defence (tolerance or resistance) and their evolution. We conclude that (i) the interactions between brood parasites and their hosts provide a highly tractable system for studying the evolution of tolerance, (ii) studies of host defences against brood parasites should investigate both resistance and tolerance, and (iii) tolerance and resistance can lead to contrasting evolutionary scenarios.
dc.publisherCambridge University Press
dc.sourceBiological Reviews
dc.subjectKeywords: Brood parasitism; Egg rejection; Evolutionary equilibrium; Hosts; Resistance; Strategy blocking; Tolerance
dc.titleThe evolution of acceptance and tolerance in hosts of avian brood parasites
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume91
dc.date.issued2015
local.identifier.absfor060201 - Behavioural Ecology
local.identifier.ariespublicationa383154xPUB1653
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationMedina, Iliana, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationLangmore, Naomi, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage9
local.identifier.doi10.1111/brv.12181
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2021-08-01T08:24:52Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84924657047
local.identifier.thomsonID000379926500001
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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