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Attending to music decreases inattentional blindness

Beanland, Vanessa; Allen, Rosemary; Pammer, Kristen

Description

This article investigates how auditory attention affects inattentional blindness (IB), a failure of conscious awareness in which an observer does not notice an unexpected event because their attention is engaged elsewhere. Previous research using the attentional blink paradigm has indicated that listening to music can reduce failures of conscious awareness. It was proposed that listening to music would decrease IB by reducing observers' frequency of task-unrelated thoughts (TUTs). Observers...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBeanland, Vanessa
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Rosemary
dc.contributor.authorPammer, Kristen
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:27:18Z
dc.identifier.issn1053-8100
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/68166
dc.description.abstractThis article investigates how auditory attention affects inattentional blindness (IB), a failure of conscious awareness in which an observer does not notice an unexpected event because their attention is engaged elsewhere. Previous research using the attentional blink paradigm has indicated that listening to music can reduce failures of conscious awareness. It was proposed that listening to music would decrease IB by reducing observers' frequency of task-unrelated thoughts (TUTs). Observers completed an IB task that varied both visual and auditory demands. Listening to music was associated with significantly lower IB, but only when observers actively attended to the music. Follow-up experiments suggest this was due to the distracting qualities of the audio task. The results also suggest a complex relationship between IB and TUTs: during demanding tasks, as predicted, noticers of the unexpected stimulus reported fewer TUTs than non-noticers. During less demanding tasks, however, noticers reported more TUTs than non-noticers.
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.sourceConsciousness and Cognition
dc.subjectKeywords: adult; article; attention; auditory response; awareness; consciousness; consciousness disorder; female; follow up; human; inattentional blindness; male; music therapy; task performance; visual system function; Affect; Attention; Attentional Blink; Auditor
dc.titleAttending to music decreases inattentional blindness
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume20
dc.date.issued2011
local.identifier.absfor170100 - PSYCHOLOGY
local.identifier.ariespublicationf2965xPUB1637
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationBeanland, Vanessa, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationAllen, Rosemary, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationPammer, Kristen, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue4
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.concog.2011.04.009
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T08:15:54Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-80054857519
local.identifier.thomsonID000297278100034
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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