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Breeding system, genetic diversity and clonal structure in the sub-alpine forb Rutidosis leiolepis F. Muell. (Asteraceae)

Young, Anne; Hill, J.; Murray, Brad; Peakall, Rodney

Description

Genetic markers, controlled pollinations and chromosome analysis were used to examine the breeding system, clonal structure, genetic diversity and cytological complexity of populations of the endangered sub-alpine forb Rutidosis leiolepis. Results show that R. leiolepis: (1) has a strong sporophytic self-incompatibility system; (2) exhibits significant clonality and that the importance of vegetative reproduction increases at higher altitudes; (3) is genetically diverse, but that variation...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorYoung, Anne
dc.contributor.authorHill, J.
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Brad
dc.contributor.authorPeakall, Rodney
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:27:16Z
dc.identifier.issn0006-3207
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/68145
dc.description.abstractGenetic markers, controlled pollinations and chromosome analysis were used to examine the breeding system, clonal structure, genetic diversity and cytological complexity of populations of the endangered sub-alpine forb Rutidosis leiolepis. Results show that R. leiolepis: (1) has a strong sporophytic self-incompatibility system; (2) exhibits significant clonality and that the importance of vegetative reproduction increases at higher altitudes; (3) is genetically diverse, but that variation within populations decreases and differentiation among populations increases with altitude; and (4) is diploid with 2n = 22 throughout its geographic range. Based on these results, low altitude populations around Cooma and Happy Valley should be made priority areas for in situ conservation in the Species Recovery Plan currently being developed by the New South Wales National Parks and Wildlife Service because they exhibit the most sexual reproduction and highest levels of genetic variation within the species. They may also be demographically more viable in the long term, having larger effective population sizes and less likelihood of mate limitation due to low S allele richness than high altitude populations. Sampling strategies for ex situ conservation should vary from large collections within populations at low altitudes to smaller collections spread across populations at higher altitudes where more of the genetic diversity is partitioned among sites. This should give maximum representation of the species' gene pool for minimum sampling effort.
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.sourceBiological Conservation
dc.subjectKeywords: clone; conservation management; effective population size; endangered species; reproduction; self incompatibility; Australia; Asteraceae; Leiolepis; Rutidosis Allozyme; Chromosome; Clonal; Conservation; Self-incompatibility
dc.titleBreeding system, genetic diversity and clonal structure in the sub-alpine forb Rutidosis leiolepis F. Muell. (Asteraceae)
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.description.refereedYes
local.identifier.citationvolume106
dc.date.issued2002
local.identifier.absfor060705 - Plant Physiology
local.identifier.ariespublicationMigratedxPub1631
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationYoung, Anne, University of Newcastle
local.contributor.affiliationHill, J., College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationMurray, Brad, University of Technology Sydney
local.contributor.affiliationPeakall, Rodney, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage71
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage78
local.identifier.doi10.1016/S0006-3207(01)00230-0
dc.date.updated2015-12-10T11:05:16Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-0036255938
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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