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Ain't I a woman? Female landmine survivors' beauty pageants and the ethics of staring

Bloul, Rachel

Description

The paper addresses the recent flurry of beauty pageants as reintegration rituals which specifically aim at the symbolic integration of some stigmatized embodied identities: Miss HIV (Botswana,1 Uganda, Nigeria, Zimbabwe but also Russia), Mr or Ms AIDS (Kenya) and the most recent Miss Landmine (Angola, Cambodia). Common reactions to such events betray a most uncomfortable moral quandary: people seem torn between condemnation, repulsion and a very hesitant acknowledgement of the stated aim of...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBloul, Rachel
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:26:21Z
dc.identifier.issn1350-4630
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/67719
dc.description.abstractThe paper addresses the recent flurry of beauty pageants as reintegration rituals which specifically aim at the symbolic integration of some stigmatized embodied identities: Miss HIV (Botswana,1 Uganda, Nigeria, Zimbabwe but also Russia), Mr or Ms AIDS (Kenya) and the most recent Miss Landmine (Angola, Cambodia). Common reactions to such events betray a most uncomfortable moral quandary: people seem torn between condemnation, repulsion and a very hesitant acknowledgement of the stated aim of positive re-integration. The paper explores this moral discomfort through its relations to a number of unresolved issues: the ambiguous status of beauty, the complex relationships between stigma and (its lack of) public representation, the multiple uses of beauty pageants as integrative rituals and the importance of beauty practices as a means to re-create meaning and dignity in distressing circumstances. Contestants' interviews make it clear that they use the beauty pageants as one of the few - or maybe the only - site allowing for personal, social and political affirmation. The necessary collective dimension of these affirmations is linked to the socio-cultural and political contexts of countries just re-emerging from armed struggle.
dc.publisherRoutledge, Taylor & Francis Group
dc.sourceSocial Identities
dc.subjectKeywords: ethics; landmine; morality; womens status beauty pageant; ethics of staring; landmine survivors; stigma
dc.titleAin't I a woman? Female landmine survivors' beauty pageants and the ethics of staring
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume18
dc.date.issued2012
local.identifier.absfor160800 - SOCIOLOGY
local.identifier.ariespublicationf5625xPUB1507
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationBloul, Rachel, College of Arts and Social Sciences, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage3
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage18
local.identifier.doi10.1080/13504630.2012.629507
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T08:47:38Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84859079507
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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