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Key lessons for achieving biodiversity-sensitive cities and towns

Stagoll (Ikin), Karen; Le Roux, Darren; Rayner, Laura; Villasenor, Nelida; Eyles, Kathryn; Gibbons, Philip; Manning, Adrian; Lindenmayer, David B

Description

Australia's urban landscapes offer opportunities to marry socio-economic and biodiversity conservation objectives. Yet, information is needed on what urban landscape and habitat features are important for wildlife. In this article, we draw together our research from southeastern Australia to describe key lessons for biodiversity-sensitive cities and towns. Lesson 1: The effects of urbanization on wildlife extend into adjacent habitats. We recommend retaining large, undisturbed areas of habitat...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorStagoll (Ikin), Karen
dc.contributor.authorLe Roux, Darren
dc.contributor.authorRayner, Laura
dc.contributor.authorVillasenor, Nelida
dc.contributor.authorEyles, Kathryn
dc.contributor.authorGibbons, Philip
dc.contributor.authorManning, Adrian
dc.contributor.authorLindenmayer, David B
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:25:06Z
dc.identifier.issn1442-7001
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/67483
dc.description.abstractAustralia's urban landscapes offer opportunities to marry socio-economic and biodiversity conservation objectives. Yet, information is needed on what urban landscape and habitat features are important for wildlife. In this article, we draw together our research from southeastern Australia to describe key lessons for biodiversity-sensitive cities and towns. Lesson 1: The effects of urbanization on wildlife extend into adjacent habitats. We recommend retaining large, undisturbed areas of habitat away from development, avoiding intensive development adjacent to important conservation areas, prioritizing areas of ecological and social significance, screening light and noise pollution at the urban fringe and around large nature reserves, and planting appropriately provenanced locally native species for public streetscapes, parks and gardens. Lesson 2: Strategic enhancement of urban greenspace offers biodiversity gains. We recommend increasing the total amount of greenspace cover, maintaining ecological structures as habitat islands, using landscaping techniques to minimize risks to human safety, and gardening with low-flowering native shrubs. Lesson 3: Large old trees need to be managed for long-term sustainability. We recommend retaining large old trees in new developments, increasing the maximum standing life of urban trees, protecting regenerating areas and planting more seedlings, supplementing habitat features associated with large trees, and ensuring that young trees have space to grow through time. Lesson 4: Education and engagement connects residents with nature and raises awareness. We recommend education programs to enhance opportunities for residents to experience and learn about biodiversity, engaging residents in the establishment and maintenance of wildlife habitat, providing 'cues to care', facilitating access to garden plants that benefit wildlife, and encouraging cat containment. These lessons provide an evidence-base for implementing conservation and management actions to improve the capacity of our cities and towns to support a diverse and abundant biota.
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.sourceEcological Management and Restoration
dc.titleKey lessons for achieving biodiversity-sensitive cities and towns
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume16
dc.date.issued2015
local.identifier.absfor050200 - ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE AND MANAGEMENT
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4279067xPUB1463
local.type.statusAccepted Version
local.contributor.affiliationStagoll (Ikin), Karen, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationLe Roux, Darren, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationRayner, Laura, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationVillasenor, Nelida, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationEyles, Kathryn, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationGibbons, Philip, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationManning, Adrian, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationLindenmayer, David, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage206
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage214
local.identifier.doi10.1111/emr.12180
local.identifier.absseo960800 - FLORA, FAUNA AND BIODIVERSITY
dc.date.updated2015-12-10T10:53:06Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84941618954
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dc.provenancehttp://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/1442-7001/..."author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). 12 months embargo" from SHERPA/RoMEO site (as at 23/10/18). This is the pre-peer reviewed version of the following article: [Ikin, Karen, et al. "Key lessons for achieving biodiversity‚Äźsensitive cities and towns." Ecological Management & Restoration 16.3 (2015): 206-214.], which has been published in final form at [https://dx.doi.org/10.1111/emr.12180]. This article may be used for non-commercial purposes in accordance with Wiley Terms and Conditions for Use of Self-Archived Versions.
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