Skip navigation
Skip navigation

The effect of sex-biased dispersal on opposite-sexed spatial genetic structure and inbreeding risk

Blyton, Michaela; Banks, Samuel; Peakall, Rodney

Description

Natal sex-biased dispersal has long been thought to reduce the risk of inbreeding by spatially separating opposite-sexed kin. Yet, comprehensive and quantitative evaluations of this hypothesis are lacking. In this study, we quantified the effectiveness of sex-biased dispersal as an inbreeding avoidance strategy by combining spatially explicit simulations and empirical data. We quantified the extent of kin clustering by measuring the degree of spatial autocorrelation among opposite-sexed...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBlyton, Michaela
dc.contributor.authorBanks, Samuel
dc.contributor.authorPeakall, Rodney
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:24:42Z
dc.identifier.issn0962-1083
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/67316
dc.description.abstractNatal sex-biased dispersal has long been thought to reduce the risk of inbreeding by spatially separating opposite-sexed kin. Yet, comprehensive and quantitative evaluations of this hypothesis are lacking. In this study, we quantified the effectiveness of sex-biased dispersal as an inbreeding avoidance strategy by combining spatially explicit simulations and empirical data. We quantified the extent of kin clustering by measuring the degree of spatial autocorrelation among opposite-sexed individuals (FM structure). This allowed us to systematically explore how the extent of sex-biased dispersal, generational overlap, and mate searching distance, influenced both kin clustering, and the resulting inbreeding in the absence of complementary inbreeding avoidance strategies. Simulations revealed that when sex-biased dispersal was limited, positive FM genetic structure developed quickly and increased as the mate searching distance decreased or as generational overlap increased. Interestingly, complete long-range sex-biased dispersal did not prevent the development of FM genetic structure when generations overlapped. We found a very strong correlation between FM genetic structure and both FIS under random mating, and pedigree-based measures of inbreeding. Thus, we show that the detection of FM genetic structure can be a strong indicator of inbreeding risk. Empirical data for two species with different life history strategies yielded patterns congruent with our simulations. Our study illustrates a new application of spatial genetic autocorrelation analysis that offers a framework for quantifying the risk of inbreeding that is easily extendable to other species. Furthermore, our findings provide other researchers with a context for interpreting observed patterns of opposite-sexed spatial genetic structure.
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.sourceMolecular Ecology
dc.titleThe effect of sex-biased dispersal on opposite-sexed spatial genetic structure and inbreeding risk
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume24
dc.date.issued2015
local.identifier.absfor060411 - Population, Ecological and Evolutionary Genetics
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9511635xPUB1435
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationBlyton, Michaela, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBanks, Samuel, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationPeakall, Rodney, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1681
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage1695
local.identifier.doi10.1111/mec.13149
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2015-12-10T10:49:36Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84933528947
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Blyton_The_effect_of_sex-biased_2015.pdf332.47 kBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator