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Natural history of gambling problems: Results from a general population survey

Cunningham, John; Hodgins, David; Toneatto, Tony

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Aims: The study explored reasons for change among a sample of former problem gamblers. It was predicted that former heavy gamblers with more severe problems prior to resolution would be more likely to volunteer a negative consequence driven reason for change as compared to participants with less severe gambling problems prior to resolution. Methods: A random digit dialing telephone survey of 8,467 adults was conducted in Ontario, Canada. Respondents who had a gambling problem at some point in...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorCunningham, John
dc.contributor.authorHodgins, David
dc.contributor.authorToneatto, Tony
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:24:01Z
dc.date.available2015-12-10T23:24:01Z
dc.identifier.issn0939-5911
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/67055
dc.description.abstractAims: The study explored reasons for change among a sample of former problem gamblers. It was predicted that former heavy gamblers with more severe problems prior to resolution would be more likely to volunteer a negative consequence driven reason for change as compared to participants with less severe gambling problems prior to resolution. Methods: A random digit dialing telephone survey of 8,467 adults was conducted in Ontario, Canada. Respondents who had a gambling problem at some point in their life but who endorsed no gambling problems in the last year (n = 450) were asked if they recalled a period in their life where they gambled more than they do now. Those respondents who recalled such a period and who had never accessed any treatment or used Gamblers Anonymous (n = 130) were asked why they quit or reduced their gambling and what strategies they had employed. Responses were tape-recorded and transcribed. Results: Common reasons for change reflected maturational life changes (moving, getting a job, marrying) or a cognitive reappraisal regarding gambling. Former problem gamblers with more severe problems prior to resolution were more likely to endorse a negative consequence driven reason for change (usually financial concerns) as compared to those with less severe problems. Conclusions: Many people 'drift out' of gambling problems because of other changes in their lives. Conducting natural history research with representative samples is important because it allows these drifting out or maturational reasons to be recognized as central to many resolutions from gambling problems.
dc.publisherVerlag Hans Huber
dc.sourceSucht
dc.subjectKeywords: adult; article; Canada; controlled study; female; financial management; health survey; human; life; major clinical study; male; marriage; pathological gambling; recall; tape recorder; telephone; work Gambling; Multi-method; Natural history
dc.titleNatural history of gambling problems: Results from a general population survey
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume55
dc.date.issued2009
local.identifier.absfor111714 - Mental Health
local.identifier.absfor170106 - Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
local.identifier.ariespublicationU3488905xPUB1389
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationCunningham, John, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationHodgins, David, University of Calgary
local.contributor.affiliationToneatto, Tony, Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto
local.bibliographicCitation.issue2
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage98
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage103
local.identifier.doi10.1024/2009.02.05
local.identifier.absseo920410 - Mental Health
local.identifier.absseo920209 - Mental Health Services
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T09:59:36Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-77955361873
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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