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Nest destruction elicits indiscriminate con- versus heterospecific brood parasitism in a captive bird

Shaw, Rachael C.; Feeney, William; Hauber, Mark E.

Description

Following nest destruction, the laying of physiologically committed eggs (eggs that are ovulated, yolked, and making their way through the oviduct) in the nests of other birds is considered a viable pathway for the evolution of obligate interspecific brood parasitism. While intraspecific brood parasitism in response to nest predation has been experimentally demonstrated, this pathway has yet to be evaluated in an interspecific context. We studied patterns of egg laying following experimental...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorShaw, Rachael C.
dc.contributor.authorFeeney, William
dc.contributor.authorHauber, Mark E.
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:22:53Z
dc.identifier.issn2045-7758
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/66714
dc.description.abstractFollowing nest destruction, the laying of physiologically committed eggs (eggs that are ovulated, yolked, and making their way through the oviduct) in the nests of other birds is considered a viable pathway for the evolution of obligate interspecific brood parasitism. While intraspecific brood parasitism in response to nest predation has been experimentally demonstrated, this pathway has yet to be evaluated in an interspecific context. We studied patterns of egg laying following experimental nest destruction in captive zebra finches, Taeniopygia guttata, a frequent intraspecific brood parasite. We found that zebra finches laid physiologically committed eggs indiscriminately between nests containing conspecific eggs and nests containing heterospecific eggs (of Bengalese finches, Lonchura striata vars. domestica), despite the con- and heterospecific eggs differing in both size and coloration. This is the first experimental evidence that nest destruction may provide a pathway for the evolution of interspecific brood parasitism in birds.
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Inc
dc.sourceEcology and Evolution
dc.titleNest destruction elicits indiscriminate con- versus heterospecific brood parasitism in a captive bird
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume4
dc.date.issued2014
local.identifier.absfor060201 - Behavioural Ecology
local.identifier.absfor060303 - Biological Adaptation
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9511635xPUB1330
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationShaw, Rachael C., University of Auckland
local.contributor.affiliationFeeney, William, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationHauber, Mark E., University of Auckland
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue23
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage4500
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage4504
local.identifier.doi10.1002/ece3.1243
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2015-12-10T10:35:21Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84913566546
local.identifier.thomsonID000346084500007
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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