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Perceptions of addictions as societal problems in Canada, Sweden, Finland and St. Petersburg, Russia

Holma, Kari; Koski-Jannes, Anja; Raitasalo, Kirsimarja; Blomqvist, Jan; Pervova, Irina; Cunningham, John

Description

Aims: This study reports on the relative gravity people attribute to various addictive behaviors with respect to other societal concerns in four northern populations with different history, social policy and treatment alternatives for addicted individuals. Methods: Random population surveys were conducted in Canada, Sweden, Finland and St. Petersburg, Russia. In Finland and Sweden, the survey was conducted by mail, in Canada and St. Petersburg by phone. As a part of this survey, the respondents...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHolma, Kari
dc.contributor.authorKoski-Jannes, Anja
dc.contributor.authorRaitasalo, Kirsimarja
dc.contributor.authorBlomqvist, Jan
dc.contributor.authorPervova, Irina
dc.contributor.authorCunningham, John
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:22:47Z
dc.date.available2015-12-10T23:22:47Z
dc.identifier.issn1022-6877
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/66663
dc.description.abstractAims: This study reports on the relative gravity people attribute to various addictive behaviors with respect to other societal concerns in four northern populations with different history, social policy and treatment alternatives for addicted individuals. Methods: Random population surveys were conducted in Canada, Sweden, Finland and St. Petersburg, Russia. In Finland and Sweden, the survey was conducted by mail, in Canada and St. Petersburg by phone. As a part of this survey, the respondents were asked to assess the gravity of various societal problems, some of which involved various addictive behaviors. The data were analyzed by descriptive statistical methods, factor analysis, contextual analysis and multiple regression analysis. Results: Hard drugs, criminality and environmental issues belonged to the topmost problems in all data samples. Overall, Finns and Canadians appeared the least worried about various societal problems, Swedes seemed the most worried and St. Petersburgian views were the most polarized. Two factors were extracted from the combined data. Factor 1 covered criminal behavior and various addictions; it was named Threats to Safety factor. Factor 2 comprised social equality issues. The country context explained 12.5% of the variance of the safety factor and 7.9% of the equality factor. Conclusions: Despite some cultural variation in the gravity assessments, the central core of the social representation of addictive behaviors tends still to be linked with 'badness' since they were mainly grouped with various forms of criminal behavior in all these countries.
dc.publisherKarger AG
dc.sourceEuropean Addiction Research
dc.subjectKeywords: addiction; adult; article; Canada; crime; environmental factor; female; Finland; human; male; priority journal; Russian Federation; social problem; society; Sweden; Adult; Attitude to Health; Canada; Cross-Cultural Comparison; Cross-Sectional Studies; Fem Addictive behaviors; Cross-cultural comparison; Social representations; Societal problems
dc.titlePerceptions of addictions as societal problems in Canada, Sweden, Finland and St. Petersburg, Russia
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume17
dc.date.issued2011
local.identifier.absfor111714 - Mental Health
local.identifier.ariespublicationU3488905xPUB1322
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationHolma, Kari, School of Humanities and Social Sciences, University of Tampere
local.contributor.affiliationKoski-Jannes, Anja, University of Tampere
local.contributor.affiliationRaitasalo, Kirsimarja, National Institute of Health and Welfare, Helsinki
local.contributor.affiliationBlomqvist, Jan, The Centre for Social Research on Alcohol and Drugs (SoRAD), Stockholm University
local.contributor.affiliationPervova, Irina, School of Sociology, St. Petersburg State University
local.contributor.affiliationCunningham, John, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.bibliographicCitation.issue2
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage106
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage112
local.identifier.doi10.1159/000323278
local.identifier.absseo920410 - Mental Health
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T09:59:07Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-79251541185
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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