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Detection of bacterial DNA in lymph nodes of Crohn's disease patients using high throughput sequencing

O'Brien, Claire; Pavli, Paul; Gordon, David; Allison, Gwen

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Our aim was to determine whether or not specific microorganisms were transported selectively to lymph nodes in Crohn's disease (CD) by comparing node and mucosal microbial communities in patients and controls. We also sought evidence of dysbiosis and bacterial translocation. Lymph nodes, and involved and uninvolved mucosal samples were obtained from resections of 58 patients (29 CD, eight 'other inflammatory bowel disease' (IBD) and 21 non-IBD). Universal primers targeting V1-V3 regions of...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorO'Brien, Claire
dc.contributor.authorPavli, Paul
dc.contributor.authorGordon, David
dc.contributor.authorAllison, Gwen
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:22:35Z
dc.identifier.issn0017-5749
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/66583
dc.description.abstractOur aim was to determine whether or not specific microorganisms were transported selectively to lymph nodes in Crohn's disease (CD) by comparing node and mucosal microbial communities in patients and controls. We also sought evidence of dysbiosis and bacterial translocation. Lymph nodes, and involved and uninvolved mucosal samples were obtained from resections of 58 patients (29 CD, eight 'other inflammatory bowel disease' (IBD) and 21 non-IBD). Universal primers targeting V1-V3 regions of bacterial 16S rRNA genes were used to amplify bacterial DNA and amplicons sequenced using high throughput sequencing. 20 patients (eight CD (28%), two other IBD (25%) and 10 non-IBD (48%)) had PCR positive nodes. All samples from an individual were similar: there was no evidence of selective concentration of any microorganism in nodes. No specific microorganism was present in the nodes of all CD samples. Escherichia/Shigella were common in all patient groups but patients with ileal CD had a greater proportion of Escherichia coli reads in their nodes than other CD patients (p=0.0475). Campylobacter, Helicobacter and Yersinia were uncommon; Mycobacterium and Listeria were not detected. Dysbiosis was present in all groups but shifts were specific and no common pattern emerged. It is unlikely that a single bacterium perpetuates inflammation in late stage CD; dysbiosis was common and we found no evidence of increased bacterial translocation. We believe that future studies should focus on early disease and viable bacteria in nodes, aphthous ulcers and granulomas, as they may be more relevant in the initiation of inflammation in CD. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Group
dc.sourceGut
dc.titleDetection of bacterial DNA in lymph nodes of Crohn's disease patients using high throughput sequencing
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume63
dc.date.issued2014
local.identifier.absfor060504 - Microbial Ecology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9511635xPUB1309
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationO'Brien, Claire, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationPavli, Paul, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationGordon, David, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationAllison, Gwen, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue10
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1596
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage1606
local.identifier.doi10.1136/gutjnl-2013-305320
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2015-12-10T10:32:36Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84908506755
local.identifier.thomsonID000341928300012
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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