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New Man and "New Lad" with Chinese Characteristics? Cosmopolitanism, Cultural Hybridity and Men's Lifestyle Magazines in China

Song, Geng; Lee, Tracy K

Description

In China, although "general interest" magazines can be said to have existed during the Maoist and early post-Maoist eras, Western-style magazines that promote a consumerist lifestyle came into being and gained widespread popularity only in the past two decades. Among them, an entire group of titles consists of localised Chinese editions of internationally popular lifestyle magazines. This paper explores the interaction of global trends and influences with local cultures and realities in men's...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorSong, Geng
dc.contributor.authorLee, Tracy K
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:18:55Z
dc.identifier.issn1035-7823
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/65838
dc.description.abstractIn China, although "general interest" magazines can be said to have existed during the Maoist and early post-Maoist eras, Western-style magazines that promote a consumerist lifestyle came into being and gained widespread popularity only in the past two decades. Among them, an entire group of titles consists of localised Chinese editions of internationally popular lifestyle magazines. This paper explores the interaction of global trends and influences with local cultures and realities in men's lifestyle magazines published in China. In particular, it discusses the Chinese "variations" of the Western "new man" and "new lad" types of male image. Despite the superficial similarities with Western images, critical readings and quantitative studies of the verbal and visual content of these magazines reveal some distinctive "Chinese" features. As a form of popular culture, the men's lifestyle magazine lends expression to the fantasies, desires and needs of "new rich" men in China. With consumerism and aspirationalism at the centre of its ideological construction, it serves as an interesting site of negotiation between what Lisa Rofel calls the two aspects of "cosmopolitanism with Chinese characteristics" - namely, a self-conscious transcendence of locality and a domestication of cosmopolitanism by way of renegotiating China's place in the world.
dc.publisherCarfax Publishing, Taylor & Francis Group
dc.sourceAsian Studies Review
dc.subjectKeywords: China; consumerism; cosmopolitanism; cultural hybridity; gender; masculinity; men's magazines; popular culture
dc.titleNew Man and "New Lad" with Chinese Characteristics? Cosmopolitanism, Cultural Hybridity and Men's Lifestyle Magazines in China
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume36
dc.date.issued2012
local.identifier.absfor160800 - SOCIOLOGY
local.identifier.ariespublicationf5625xPUB1169
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationSong, Geng, College of Asia and the Pacific, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationLee, Tracy K, Chu Hai College of Higher Education
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue3
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage345
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage367
local.identifier.doi10.1080/10357823.2012.711808
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T08:39:03Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84865391122
local.identifier.thomsonID000305395200008
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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