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Understanding basic species population dynamics for effective control: a case study on community-led culling of the common myna (Acridotheres tristis)

Grarock, Kate; Tidemann, Chris; Wood, Jeffrey; Lindenmayer, David B

Description

Population manipulation of introduced species can be difficult and many widespread eradication or reduction attempts have failed. Understanding the population dynamics of a species is essential for undertaking a successful control program. Despite this, control attempts are frequently undertaken with limited knowledge of the species population dynamics. For example, in Australia, concern over the impact of the introduced common myna (Acridotheres tristis) has led to community members culling...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorGrarock, Kate
dc.contributor.authorTidemann, Chris
dc.contributor.authorWood, Jeffrey
dc.contributor.authorLindenmayer, David B
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:15:44Z
dc.identifier.issn1387-3547
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/64768
dc.description.abstractPopulation manipulation of introduced species can be difficult and many widespread eradication or reduction attempts have failed. Understanding the population dynamics of a species is essential for undertaking a successful control program. Despite this, control attempts are frequently undertaken with limited knowledge of the species population dynamics. For example, in Australia, concern over the impact of the introduced common myna (Acridotheres tristis) has led to community members culling the species. In this paper, we assessed the impact of community-led common myna culling program over broad and fine-scales in Canberra, Australia. We utilized a basic population model to enhance understanding of common myna population dynamics and the potential influence of various culling regimes. We found a significant negative relationship between common myna abundance and culling at fine-scales (1 km2). However, over broad-scales the relationship between common myna abundance and culling was not significant. Our population model indicated culling at a rate of 25 birds per km2 per year would reduce common myna abundance, regardless of initial density. Our results suggest that currently too few individuals are being removed from the Canberra population, and natural reproduction, survival and/or immigration is able to replace the culled individuals. This highlights the value of undertaking basic population modeling to assess if potential control measures are capable of achieving desired outcomes. Our work provides information for researchers, government and community groups interested in controlling not only the common myna, but also other introduced species.
dc.language.isoen_AU
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.sourceBiological Invasions
dc.titleUnderstanding basic species population dynamics for effective control: a case study on community-led culling of the common myna (Acridotheres tristis)
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolumeonline 10 Nov 13
dc.date.issued2013
local.identifier.absfor050103 - Invasive Species Ecology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu4279067xPUB995
local.type.statusAccepted Version
local.contributor.affiliationGrarock, Kate, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationTidemann, Chris, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationWood, Jeffrey, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationLindenmayer, David, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.identifier.doi10.1007/s10530-013-0580-2
local.identifier.absseo960411 - Control of Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species in Urban and Industrial Environments
local.identifier.absseo960404 - Control of Animal Pests, Diseases and Exotic Species in Forest and Woodlands Environments
dc.date.updated2015-12-10T09:47:14Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84902261280
local.identifier.thomsonID000338445000009
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
dcterms.provenanceThe author can only find this version which is done as a thesis chapter, but it notes the name of the published paper.
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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