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Sugary drink consumption behaviours among young adults at university

O'Leary, Fiona; Hattersley, Libby; King, Lesley; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret

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Aim: Sugary drink consumption is associated with weight gain, and young adults are the highest consumers. To inform a university healthy beverage intervention, we studied the settings and the types and amounts of sugary drinks consumed by a sample drawn from the student population. Methods: Fifty university students (24 male) were recruited to keep records of all beverages consumed over four consecutive days. The records were analysed by gender, drink category and consumption setting. Results:...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorO'Leary, Fiona
dc.contributor.authorHattersley, Libby
dc.contributor.authorKing, Lesley
dc.contributor.authorAllman-Farinelli, Margaret
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:15:39Z
dc.identifier.issn1747-0080
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/64737
dc.description.abstractAim: Sugary drink consumption is associated with weight gain, and young adults are the highest consumers. To inform a university healthy beverage intervention, we studied the settings and the types and amounts of sugary drinks consumed by a sample drawn from the student population. Methods: Fifty university students (24 male) were recruited to keep records of all beverages consumed over four consecutive days. The records were analysed by gender, drink category and consumption setting. Results: Males drank marginally more sugary drinks than females (median daily intake of 526mL compared with 300mL, P=0.06). Median energy intake from sugary drinks was 928kJ for males and 481kJ for females. Carbonated soft drinks and fruit-based drinks accounted for 64% of energy from sugary drinks for males; and fruit and sweetened milk-based drinks accounted for 68% of energy for females. Half of all sugary drink consumption occurred at home followed by social settings. Conclusion: Health promotion programmes aiming to reduce sugary drink consumption in this group would benefit from gender-differentiated strategies with respect to types of drinks consumed with a focus on the home and social settings.
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.sourceNutrition and Dietetics
dc.subjectKeywords: Soft drinks; Sugar-sweetened beverages; Young adults
dc.titleSugary drink consumption behaviours among young adults at university
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume69
dc.date.issued2012
local.identifier.absfor111701 - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health
local.identifier.ariespublicationf5625xPUB990
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationO'Leary, Fiona, University of Sydney
local.contributor.affiliationHattersley, Libby, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationKing, Lesley, University of Sydney
local.contributor.affiliationAllman-Farinelli, Margaret, University of Sydney
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue2
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage119
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage123
local.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1747-0080.2012.01583.x
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T09:46:34Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84861952938
local.identifier.thomsonID000304834100009
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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