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Polyandry occurs because females initially trade sex for protection

Slatyer, R; Jennions, Michael; Backwell, Patricia

Description

In many species, females mate with multiple males, suggesting that polyandry confers fitness-enhancing benefits. The benefits of polyandry are usually attributed to either the cumulative acquisition of direct material benefits from consecutive mates or genetic benefits resulting from access to greater sperm diversity that facilitates cryptic female choice and sperm competition or simply elevates genetic diversity among offspring. With the notable exception of studies in birds that contrast...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorSlatyer, R
dc.contributor.authorJennions, Michael
dc.contributor.authorBackwell, Patricia
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:15:31Z
dc.identifier.issn0003-3472
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/64692
dc.description.abstractIn many species, females mate with multiple males, suggesting that polyandry confers fitness-enhancing benefits. The benefits of polyandry are usually attributed to either the cumulative acquisition of direct material benefits from consecutive mates or genetic benefits resulting from access to greater sperm diversity that facilitates cryptic female choice and sperm competition or simply elevates genetic diversity among offspring. With the notable exception of studies in birds that contrast within-pair and extrapair copulations, the alternative explanation that females receive different benefits from different types of mates is rarely explored. In the fiddler crab . Uca mjoebergi, females mate multiply using two distinct mating tactics: surface and burrow mating. We found that females gained a different benefit from each type of mating. Females that initially mated on the mudflat surface secured the help of their mate in burrow defence. Male neighbours were significantly more likely to help after mating. In contrast, a female's final mating allowed her to choose the mate that would sire most of her offspring and gain access to a burrow that she then used for breeding. Together, these benefits provide a strong incentive for females to mate multiply.
dc.publisherAcademic Press
dc.sourceAnimal Behaviour
dc.subjectKeywords: breeding site; burrow; crab; extra-pair copulation; female; fitness; mate choice; mudflat; polyandry; reproductive cost; sexual selection; sperm competition; Aves; Decapoda (Crustacea); Ocypodidae; Uca Female choice; Fiddler crab; Polyandry; Sexual selection; Uca mjoebergi
dc.titlePolyandry occurs because females initially trade sex for protection
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume83
dc.date.issued2012
local.identifier.absfor060201 - Behavioural Ecology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9511635xPUB982
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationSlatyer, R, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationJennions, Michael, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationBackwell, Patricia, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1203
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage1206
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.anbehav.2012.02.011
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T12:10:09Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84859713134
local.identifier.thomsonID000302792700008
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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