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Genetic spatial autocorrelation can readily detect sex-biased dispersal

Banks, Samuel; Peakall, Rodney

Description

Sex-biased dispersal is expected to generate differences in the fine-scale genetic structure of males and females. Therefore, spatial analyses of multilocus genotypes may offer a powerful approach for detecting sex-biased dispersal in natural populations. However, the effects of sex-biased dispersal on fine-scale genetic structure have not been explored. We used simulations and multilocus spatial autocorrelation analysis to investigate how sex-biased dispersal influences fine-scale genetic...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorBanks, Samuel
dc.contributor.authorPeakall, Rodney
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:13:52Z
dc.identifier.issn0962-1083
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/64614
dc.description.abstractSex-biased dispersal is expected to generate differences in the fine-scale genetic structure of males and females. Therefore, spatial analyses of multilocus genotypes may offer a powerful approach for detecting sex-biased dispersal in natural populations. However, the effects of sex-biased dispersal on fine-scale genetic structure have not been explored. We used simulations and multilocus spatial autocorrelation analysis to investigate how sex-biased dispersal influences fine-scale genetic structure. We evaluated three statistical tests for detecting sex-biased dispersal: bootstrap confidence intervals about autocorrelation r values and recently developed heterogeneity tests at the distance class and whole correlogram levels. Even modest sex bias in dispersal resulted in significantly different fine-scale spatial autocorrelation patterns between the sexes. This was particularly evident when dispersal was strongly restricted in the less-dispersing sex (mean distance <200 m), when differences between the sexes were readily detected over short distances. All tests had high power to detect sex-biased dispersal with large sample sizes (n ⥠250). However, there was variation in type I error rates among the tests, for which we offer specific recommendations. We found congruence between simulation predictions and empirical data from the agile antechinus, a species that exhibits male-biased dispersal, confirming the power of individual-based genetic analysis to provide insights into asymmetries in male and female dispersal. Our key recommendations for using multilocus spatial autocorrelation analyses to test for sex-biased dispersal are: (i) maximize sample size, not locus number; (ii) concentrate sampling within the scale of positive structure; (iii) evaluate several distance class sizes; (iv) use appropriate methods when combining data from multiple populations; (v) compare the appropriate groups of individuals.
dc.publisherBlackwell Publishing Ltd
dc.sourceMolecular Ecology
dc.subjectKeywords: microsatellite DNA; animal; article; biological model; ecosystem; female; genetic variability; genetics; genotype; male; marsupial; population dynamics; sexual development; statistical analysis; Animals; Data Interpretation, Statistical; Ecosystem; Female Antechinus; fine-scale genetic structure; heterogeneity testing; sex-biased dispersal; simulation; spatial autocorrelation
dc.titleGenetic spatial autocorrelation can readily detect sex-biased dispersal
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume21
dc.date.issued2012
local.identifier.absfor060411 - Population, Ecological and Evolutionary Genetics
local.identifier.absfor060809 - Vertebrate Biology
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9511635xPUB968
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationBanks, Samuel, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationPeakall, Rodney, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage2092
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage2105
local.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1365-294X.2012.05485.x
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T12:09:57Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84860682560
local.identifier.thomsonID000302932500005
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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