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Individualist and collectivist factors affecting online repurchase intentions

Frost, Dayne; Goode, Sigi; Hart, Dennis

Description

Purpose: This study aims to explore whether collectivistic and individualistic users exhibit different e-commerce loyalty and purchase intentions. Design/methodology/approach: The paper operationalises Triandis' individuality and collectivism typology. Empirical data were gathered using face-to-face questionnaire instruments with 140 respondents, comprising undergraduate students and government employees. Findings: Online shoppers are more individualistic than those who have not shopped online,...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorFrost, Dayne
dc.contributor.authorGoode, Sigi
dc.contributor.authorHart, Dennis
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:13:42Z
dc.identifier.issn1066-2243
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/64539
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This study aims to explore whether collectivistic and individualistic users exhibit different e-commerce loyalty and purchase intentions. Design/methodology/approach: The paper operationalises Triandis' individuality and collectivism typology. Empirical data were gathered using face-to-face questionnaire instruments with 140 respondents, comprising undergraduate students and government employees. Findings: Online shoppers are more individualistic than those who have not shopped online, while individualism and collectivism do not influence online loyalty. Research limitations/implications: As firms compete for online custom, it would be useful to gain some understanding of the possible effects of individual and collective behaviour on purchasing behaviour. Practical implications: Instead of competing for existing online users, online stores could expand their market by appealing to offline shoppers using collective techniques. Originality/value: Online loyalty has been an important focus of prior work and, while there has been significant focus on communities, Internet use remains a very personal activity. The paper provides new evidence that offline shoppers are more collectivistic than online shoppers.
dc.publisherEmerald Group Publishing Ltd
dc.sourceInternet Research
dc.subjectKeywords: Collectivism; Customer loyalty; Purchasing; Shopping
dc.titleIndividualist and collectivist factors affecting online repurchase intentions
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume20
dc.date.issued2010
local.identifier.absfor150504 - Marketing Measurement
local.identifier.ariespublicationf2965xPUB957
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationFrost, Dayne, College of Business and Economics, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationGoode, Sigi, College of Business and Economics, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationHart, Dennis, College of Business and Economics, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue1
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage6
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage28
local.identifier.doi10.1108/10662241011020815
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T08:34:22Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-74349102009
local.identifier.thomsonID000276069000002
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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