Skip navigation
Skip navigation
Open Research will be down for maintenance between 8:00 and 8:15 am on Tuesday, December 1 2020.

Adaptation state of the local-motion-pooling units determines the nature of the motion aftereffect to transparent motion

Edwards, Mark; Cassanello, Carlos; Kalia, Kanupriya

Description

When observers adapt to a transparent-motion stimulus, the resulting motion aftereffect (MAE) is typically in the direction opposite to the vector average of the component directions. It has been proposed that the reason for this is that it is the adaptation state at the local-level (i.e. of the local-motion-pooling units) that determines the nature of the MAE (Vidnyanszky et al. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 6(4), 157-161). The adapting stimuli used in these experiments typically consisted of...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorEdwards, Mark
dc.contributor.authorCassanello, Carlos
dc.contributor.authorKalia, Kanupriya
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:13:39Z
dc.identifier.issn0042-6989
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/64515
dc.description.abstractWhen observers adapt to a transparent-motion stimulus, the resulting motion aftereffect (MAE) is typically in the direction opposite to the vector average of the component directions. It has been proposed that the reason for this is that it is the adaptation state at the local-level (i.e. of the local-motion-pooling units) that determines the nature of the MAE (Vidnyanszky et al. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 6(4), 157-161). The adapting stimuli used in these experiments typically consisted of random-dot kinematograms, with each dot being able to move over the entire viewing aperture. Here we used spatially-localised global-plaid stimuli which enabled us, over the course of adaptation, to present either one of both motion directions at each local region. A unidirectional MAE was perceived when two motion directions were presented at each location and a transparent MAE was perceived when a single direction was presented. These results support the notion that it is the adaptation state at the local-motion-pooling level that determines the nature of the MAE to transparent motion stimuli.
dc.publisherPergamon-Elsevier Ltd
dc.sourceVision Research
dc.subjectKeywords: article; cineradiography; cognition; human; motion; motion aftereffect; motion analysis system; priority journal; visual acuity; visual adaptation; visual stimulation; visual system; Adaptation, Physiological; Afterimage; Humans; Motion Perception; Photic Adaptation; Local-motion pooling; MAE; Motion
dc.titleAdaptation state of the local-motion-pooling units determines the nature of the motion aftereffect to transparent motion
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume64
dc.date.issued2012
local.identifier.absfor170100 - PSYCHOLOGY
local.identifier.ariespublicationf5625xPUB953
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationEdwards, Mark, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationCassanello, Carlos, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationKalia , Kanupriya, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage23
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage25
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.visres.2012.05.006
local.identifier.absseo970117 - Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T09:45:42Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-84861994217
local.identifier.thomsonID000306826000004
CollectionsANU Research Publications

Download

File Description SizeFormat Image
01_Edwards_Adaptation_state_of_the_2012.pdf159.3 kBAdobe PDF    Request a copy


Items in Open Research are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.

Updated:  19 May 2020/ Responsible Officer:  University Librarian/ Page Contact:  Library Systems & Web Coordinator