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Persistence in Peripheral Refugia Promotes Phenotypic Divergence and Speciation in a Rainforest Frog

Hoskin, Conrad; Tonione, M.; Higgie, Megan; MacKenzie, Jason B.; Williams, Stephen E.; VanDerWal, Jeremy; Moritz, Craig

Description

It is well established from the fossil record and phylogeographic analyses that late Quaternary climate fluctuations led to substantial changes in species' distribution, but whether and how these fluctuations resulted in phenotypic divergence and speciation is less clear. This question can be addressed through detailed analysis of traits relevant to ecology and mating within and among intraspecific lineages that persisted in separate refugia. In a biogeographic system (the Australian Wet...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorHoskin, Conrad
dc.contributor.authorTonione, M.
dc.contributor.authorHiggie, Megan
dc.contributor.authorMacKenzie, Jason B.
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Stephen E.
dc.contributor.authorVanDerWal, Jeremy
dc.contributor.authorMoritz, Craig
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:13:20Z
dc.identifier.issn0003-0147
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/64381
dc.description.abstractIt is well established from the fossil record and phylogeographic analyses that late Quaternary climate fluctuations led to substantial changes in species' distribution, but whether and how these fluctuations resulted in phenotypic divergence and speciation is less clear. This question can be addressed through detailed analysis of traits relevant to ecology and mating within and among intraspecific lineages that persisted in separate refugia. In a biogeographic system (the Australian Wet Tropics [AWT]) with a well-established history of refugial isolation during Pleistocene glacial periods, we tested whether climate-mediated changes in distribution drove genetic and phenotypic divergence in the rainforest frog Cophixalus ornatus. We combined paleomodeling and multilocus genetics to demonstrate long-term persistence within, and isolation among, one central and two peripheral refugia. In contrast to other AWT vertebrates, the three major lineages differ in ecologically relevant morphology and in mating call, reflecting divergent selection and/or genetic drift in the peripheral isolates. Divergence in mating call and contact zone analyses suggest that the lineages now represent distinct species. The results show that climate shifts can promote genetic and phenotypic divergence and, potentially, speciation and direct attention toward incorporating adaptive traits into phylogeographic studies to better resolve the mechanisms of speciation.
dc.publisherUniversity of Chicago Press
dc.rightsAuthor/s retain copyright
dc.sourceThe American Naturalist
dc.subjectKeywords: mitochondrial DNA; RNA 16S; adaptation; climate variation; contact zone; divergence; fossil record; frog; isolated population; life history trait; morphology; natural selection; paleoclimate; peripheral region; persistence; phenotype; phylogeny; phylogeog Contact zone; Cophixalus; Mating traits; Morphology; Pleistocene refugia; Wet tropics
dc.titlePersistence in Peripheral Refugia Promotes Phenotypic Divergence and Speciation in a Rainforest Frog
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume178
dc.date.issued2011
local.identifier.absfor060309 - Phylogeny and Comparative Analysis
local.identifier.absfor060311 - Speciation and Extinction
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9511635xPUB926
local.identifier.ariespublicationu9511635xPUB1295
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationHoskin, Conrad, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationTonione, M., University of California
local.contributor.affiliationHiggie, Megan, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationMacKenzie, Jason B., University of California
local.contributor.affiliationWilliams, Stephen E., James Cook University
local.contributor.affiliationVanDerWal, Jeremy, James Cook University
local.contributor.affiliationMoritz, Craig, University of California
local.bibliographicCitation.issue5
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage561
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage578
local.identifier.doi10.1086/662164
local.identifier.absseo970105 - Expanding Knowledge in the Environmental Sciences
local.identifier.absseo970106 - Expanding Knowledge in the Biological Sciences
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T12:09:33Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-80054889846
dcterms.accessRightsOpen Access
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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