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Higher parasite richness, abundance and impact in native versus introduced cichlid fishes

Roche, Dominique; Leung, Brian; Mendoza Franco, Edgar F.; Torchin, Mark E.

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Empirical studies suggest that most exotic species have fewer parasite species in their introduced range relative to their native range. However, it is less clear how, ecologically, the loss of parasite species translates into a measurable advantage for invaders relative to native species in the new community. We compared parasitism at three levels (species richness, abundance and impact) for a pair of native and introduced cichlid fishes which compete for resources in the Panama Canal...[Show more]

dc.contributor.authorRoche, Dominique
dc.contributor.authorLeung, Brian
dc.contributor.authorMendoza Franco, Edgar F.
dc.contributor.authorTorchin, Mark E.
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-10T23:13:13Z
dc.identifier.issn0020-7519
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/1885/64321
dc.description.abstractEmpirical studies suggest that most exotic species have fewer parasite species in their introduced range relative to their native range. However, it is less clear how, ecologically, the loss of parasite species translates into a measurable advantage for invaders relative to native species in the new community. We compared parasitism at three levels (species richness, abundance and impact) for a pair of native and introduced cichlid fishes which compete for resources in the Panama Canal watershed. The introduced Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus, was infected by a single parasite species from its native range, but shared eight native parasite species with the native Vieja maculicauda. Despite acquiring new parasites in its introduced range, O. niloticus had both lower parasite species richness and lower parasite abundance compared with its native competitor. There was also a significant negative association between parasite load (abundance per individual fish) and host condition for the native fish, but no such association for the invader. The effects of parasites on the native fish varied across sites and types of parasites, suggesting that release from parasites may benefit the invader, but that the magnitude of release may depend upon interactions between the host, parasites and the environment.
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.sourceInternational Journal for Parasitology
dc.subjectKeywords: abundance; biological invasion; cichlid; host-parasite interaction; parasite; parasitism; species richness; Acanthocephalus; animal parasitosis; article; cichlid; controlled study; copepod; environmental factor; exotic species; host parasite interaction; Biological invasion; Enemy release; Metazoan parasites; Nile tilapia; Oreochromis niloticus; Panama Canal; Vieja maculicauda
dc.titleHigher parasite richness, abundance and impact in native versus introduced cichlid fishes
dc.typeJournal article
local.description.notesImported from ARIES
local.identifier.citationvolume40
dc.date.issued2010
local.identifier.absfor060307 - Host-Parasite Interactions
local.identifier.ariespublicationf2965xPUB917
local.type.statusPublished Version
local.contributor.affiliationRoche, Dominique, College of Medicine, Biology and Environment, ANU
local.contributor.affiliationLeung, Brian, McGill University
local.contributor.affiliationMendoza Franco, Edgar F., Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
local.contributor.affiliationTorchin, Mark E., Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
local.description.embargo2037-12-31
local.bibliographicCitation.issue13
local.bibliographicCitation.startpage1525
local.bibliographicCitation.lastpage1530
local.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijpara.2010.05.007
local.identifier.absseo960808 - Marine Flora, Fauna and Biodiversity
dc.date.updated2016-02-24T08:33:53Z
local.identifier.scopusID2-s2.0-77957749087
local.identifier.thomsonID000283915100007
CollectionsANU Research Publications

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